Florida Studio Theatre FST and The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee County present the panel discussion, Dangerous Worlds: Reflections on pre-WWII Germany and the roots of hatred and anti-Semitism today; The discussion will be held on April 2 at 5pm, in the Keating Theatre

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(Sarasota, FL) — Florida Studio Theatre has never shied away from theatre that challenges audiences to explore all sides of humanity – the good and the bad. The return of FST’s Stage III series definitely carries on this tradition with Mark Nadler’s production, I’m A Stranger Here Myself. In conjunction with this production, FST and The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee County present the panel discussion, Dangerous Worlds: Reflections on pre-WWII Germany and the roots of hatred and anti-Semitism today. The discussion will be held on April 2 at 5pm, in the Keating Theatre. This panel discussion is free to the public, but reservations are required. For tickets, please call the FST Box Office at (941) 366-9000, or visit FloridaStudioTheatre.org.

Nadler’s European-style cabaret musical production highlights an era that gave birth to many artists whose music still influences the cultural society of today. Taking audiences deep into the lives of these unique individuals, Nadler explores what the people of this era achieved not only as artists, but also as survivors. The Jewish Federation commented on this opportunity to talk about such an influential era in history stating, “The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee is pleased to join in FST’s mission of creating a community conversation about theatre and its impact on us all. Mark Nadler’s I’m A Stranger Here Myself brings to the forefront many themes and issues that that we see on a daily basis and are still relevant at the Jewish Federation and around the world. It’s a pleasure to be a part of this important dialog in a safe place for us all while discussing this show, voice our opinion, and discuss our past and present – all of which have been so greatly influenced by the artists of the Weimar era.”

FST’s Associate Director Kate Alexander expands on the themes within Nadler’s production stating, “This play is placed in the eerie days before the annexation of Poland. It was a time of artistic and intellectual freedom – yet the hate was simmering and smoldering beneath the surface of the German people. As Hitler himself said, ‘All great movements are popular movements. They are the volcanic eruptions of human passions and emotions, stirred into activity by the ruthless Goddess of Distress or by the torch of the spoken word cast into the midst of the people.’ Today we are seeing very similar disruptions in a world fueled by hate. It is imperative that we discuss and understand the roots of this hate and how to combat it ourselves, in our cities in our very modern, dangerous world.”

Alexander concludes her final thoughts stating, “I’m A Stranger Here Myself could not be more timely. FST is pleased to join with the Jewish Federation who have always championed the principals of ethics in many of our plays dealing with injustice on all fronts. This play hits home and all of us need to pay attention.”

 

In conjunction with FST’s Stage III production of I’m A Stranger Here Myself, FST and The Jewish Federation present the panel discussion, Dangerous Worlds: Reflections on pre-WWII Germany and the roots of hatred and anti-Semitism today. The discussion will be held on April 2 at 5pm, in the Keating Theatre. This panel discussion is free to the public, but reservations are required. For tickets, please call the FST Box Office at (941) 366-9000, or visit www.FloridaStudioTheatre.org.

About Florida Studio Theatre

Known as Sarasota’s Contemporary Theatre, Florida Studio Theatre was founded in 1973 by Jon Spelman. Starting out as a small touring company, FST traveled to places such as migrant camps and prisons. The company then acquired the former Woman’s Club building, becoming the first permanent venue. Shortly after Richard Hopkins arrived, the building was purchased and renamed The Keating Theatre. In the years that followed, Florida Studio Theatre established itself as a major force in American Theatre, presenting contemporary theatre in its five theatre venues: the Keating Theatre, the Gompertz Theatre, the Parisian style Goldstein Cabaret and John C. Court Cabaret,  and Bowne’s Lab Theatre. 

Even with its growth, Florida Studio Theatre remains firmly committed to making the arts accessible and affordable to a broad-based audience.  FST develops theatre that speaks to our living, evolving, and dynamically changing world.  As FST grows and expands, it continues to provide audiences with challenging, contemporary drama and innovative programs.

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