Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Village Roadshow Pictures’ “Edge of Tomorrow,” starring Oscar® nominee Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt and directed by Doug Liman, has earned an outstanding $33 million at the box office in early international openings

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“EDGE OF TOMORROW” RISES EARLY IN INTERNATIONAL OPENINGS

    Burbank, CA, June 5, 2014—Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Village Roadshow Pictures’ “Edge of Tomorrow,” starring Oscar® nominee Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt and directed by Doug Liman, has earned an outstanding $33 million at the box office in early international openings ahead of its June 6 worldwide debut.  The announcement was made today by Veronika Kwan Vandenberg, President of International Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures.
    “Edge of Tomorrow” had a spectacular opening in Korea, with an estimated KRW 3.9b ($3.8m) on 681 screens, including sneak preview showings.  Its Wednesday debut marked the biggest opening of all time for Warner Bros. Pictures in Korea, as well as the fourth biggest opening industry-wide, for that market.  The film also opened yesterday at #1 in Denmark and Norway, as well as France, where it was #1 in both admissions and box office even amid strong competition from U.S. product and a popular local comedy.  
Kwan Vandenberg said, “The sensational results on Wednesday, coupled with the film’s excellent playability in territories where it debuted last weekend, give us great momentum as we launch in 36 additional countries this weekend, including such major markets as Russia, Australia, Mexico and China.”
    The early box office results come on the heels of the film’s groundbreaking worldwide event when, for the first time ever, three fan premieres were held in three different cities—London, Paris and New York—in just one day, “resetting” the red carpet as Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt raced the clock to make each event before time ran out.  
    Sue Kroll, Warner Bros. Pictures President, Worldwide Marketing and International Distribution, noted, “Tom is a huge star globally and has been a phenomenal partner as we’ve introduced this exciting and original adventure to audiences everywhere.  The film has been enthusiastically embraced by critics and consumers alike.  Tom has gone above and beyond to support the film, traveling all over the world to share it with fans, and these incredible efforts have made a tremendous impact as we gear up to release ‘Edge of Tomorrow’ worldwide.”

Oscar® nominee Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt star in Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Village Roadshow Pictures’ sci-fi thriller “Edge of Tomorrow,” under the direction of Doug Liman.
The epic action of “Edge of Tomorrow” unfolds in a near future in which an alien race has hit the Earth in an unrelenting assault, unbeatable by any military unit in the world.  
Major William Cage (Cruise) is an officer who has never seen a day of combat when he is unceremoniously dropped into what amounts to a suicide mission.  Killed within minutes, Cage now finds himself inexplicably thrown into a time loop—forcing him to live out the same brutal combat over and over, fighting and dying again…and again.
But with each battle, Cage becomes able to engage the adversaries with increasing skill, alongside Special Forces warrior Rita Vrataski (Blunt).  And, as Cage and Rita take the fight to the aliens, each repeated encounter gets them one step closer to defeating the enemy.
The international cast also includes Bill Paxton, Brendan Gleeson, Noah Taylor, Kick Gurry, Dragomir Mrsic, Charlotte Riley, Jonas Armstrong, Franz Drameh, Masayoshi Haneda and Tony Way.
Liman directed “Edge of Tomorrow” from a screenplay by Christopher McQuarrie and Jez Butterworth & John-Henry Butterworth, based on the novel entitled All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka.  Erwin Stoff produced, along with Tom Lassally, Jeffrey Silver, Gregory Jacobs and Jason Hoffs.  The executive producers are Doug Liman, David Bartis, Joby Harold, Hidemi Fukuhara and Bruce Berman, with Tim Lewis and Kim Winther serving as co-producers.
Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, a 3 Arts Production, in association with Viz Productions, a Doug Liman Film, “Edge of Tomorrow.”  The film is distributed in 2D and 3D in select theatres and IMAX by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, and in select territories by Village Roadshow. www.edgeoftomorrowmovie.com
This movie has been rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence, language and brief suggestive material.  
– wbp –

 

EDGE OF TOMORROW
Oscar® nominee Tom Cruise (the “Mission: Impossible” films, “Collateral,” “Jerry Maguire”) and Emily Blunt (“The Devil Wears Prada,” “The Adjustment Bureau”) star in Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Village Roadshow Pictures’ sci-fi thriller “Edge of Tomorrow,” under the direction of Doug Liman (“The Bourne Identity,” “Mr. & Mrs. Smith”).
The epic action of “Edge of Tomorrow” unfolds in a near future in which an alien race has hit the Earth in an unrelenting assault, unbeatable by any military unit in the world.
Major William Cage (Cruise) is an officer who has never seen a day of combat when he is unceremoniously dropped into what amounts to a suicide mission. Killed within minutes, Cage now finds himself inexplicably thrown into a time loop—forcing him to live out the same brutal combat over and over, fighting and dying again…and again.
But with each battle, Cage becomes able to engage the adversaries with increasing skill, alongside Special Forces warrior Rita Vrataski (Blunt). And, as Cage and Rita take the fight to the aliens, each repeated encounter gets them one step closer to defeating the enemy.
The international cast also includes Bill Paxton (“Aliens,” HBO’s “Big Love”), Brendan Gleeson (“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1”), Noah Taylor (“Lawless”), Kick Gurry (Australian TV’s “Tangle”), Dragomir Mrsic (“Snabba Cash II”), Charlotte Riley (“World Without End”), Jonas Armstrong (BBC TV’s “Robin Hood”), Franz Drameh (“Attack the Block”), Masayoshi Haneda (“Emperor”) and Tony Way (“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”).
Liman is directing “Edge of Tomorrow” from a screenplay by Christopher McQuarrie and Jez Butterworth & John-Henry Butterworth, based on the novel entitled All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Erwin Stoff produces, along with Tom Lassally, Jeffrey Silver, Gregory Jacobs and Jason Hoffs. The executive producers are
Doug Liman, David Bartis, Joby Harold, Hidemi Fukuhara and Bruce Berman, with Tim Lewis and Kim Winther serving as co-producers.
The behind-the-scenes team includes Academy Award®-winning director of photography Dion Beebe (“Memoirs of a Geisha”), production designer Oliver Scholl (“Jumper,” “Independence Day”), editor James Herbert (“Sherlock Holmes,” “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows”), costume designer Kate Hawley (“Pacific Rim”), and Oscar®-nominated visual effects supervisor Nick Davis (“The Dark Knight”). The music is by Christophe Beck (“Frozen”).
“Edge of Tomorrow” is the first motion picture to be shot at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden.
Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, a 3 Arts Production, in association with Viz Productions, a Doug Liman Film, “Edge of Tomorrow.” Opening domestically on June 6, 2014, the film will be distributed in 2D and 3D in select theatres and IMAX by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, and in select territories by Village Roadshow.
This movie has been rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action
and violence, language and brief suggestive material.
edgeoftomorrowmovie.com

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Oscar® nominee Tom Cruise (the “Mission: Impossible” films, “Collateral,” “Jerry Maguire”) and Emily Blunt (“The Devil Wears Prada,” “The Adjustment Bureau”) star in Warner Bros. Pictures’ and Village Roadshow Pictures’ sci-fi thriller “Edge of Tomorrow,” under the direction of Doug Liman (“The Bourne Identity,” “Mr. & Mrs. Smith”).
The epic action of “Edge of Tomorrow” unfolds in a near future in which an alien race has hit the Earth in an unrelenting assault, unbeatable by any military unit in the world.
Major William Cage (Cruise) is an officer who has never seen a day of combat when he is unceremoniously dropped into what amounts to a suicide mission. Killed within minutes, Cage now finds himself inexplicably thrown into a time loop—forcing him to live out the same brutal combat over and over, fighting and dying again…and again.
But with each battle, Cage becomes able to engage the adversaries with increasing skill, alongside Special Forces warrior Rita Vrataski (Blunt). And, as Cage and Rita take the fight to the aliens, each repeated encounter gets them one step closer to defeating the enemy.
The international cast also includes Bill Paxton (“Aliens,” HBO’s “Big Love”), Brendan Gleeson (“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1”), Jonas Armstrong (BBC TV’s “Robin Hood”), Tony Way (“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”), Kick Gurry (Australian TV’s “Tangle”), Franz Drameh (“Attack the Block”), Dragomir Mrsic (“Snabba Cash II”) and Charlotte Riley (“World Without End”).
Liman directed “Edge of Tomorrow” from a screenplay by Christopher McQuarrie and Jez Butterworth & John-Henry Butterworth, based on the novel entitled All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Erwin Stoff produced the film, along with Tom Lassally, Jeffrey Silver, Gregory Jacobs and Jason Hoffs. The executive producers are Doug Liman, David Bartis, Joby Harold, Hidemi Fukuhara and Bruce Berman, with Tim Lewis and Kim Winther serving as co-producers.
The behind-the-scenes team includes Academy Award®-winning director of photography Dion Beebe (“Memoirs of a Geisha”), production designer Oliver Scholl (“Jumper,” “Independence Day”), editor James Herbert (“Sherlock Holmes,” “Sherlock
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Holmes: A Game of Shadows”), costume designer Kate Hawley (“Pacific Rim”), and Oscar®-nominated visual effects supervisor Nick Davis (“The Dark Knight”). The music is by Christophe Beck (“Frozen”).
“Edge of Tomorrow” is the first motion picture to be shot at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden.
Warner Bros. Pictures presents, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, in association with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, a 3 Arts Production, in association with Viz Productions, LLC, a Doug Liman Film, “Edge of Tomorrow.” The film will be distributed in 2D and 3D in select theatres and IMAX® by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, and in select territories by Village Roadshow Pictures.
This movie has been rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action
and violence, language and brief suggestive material.
edgeoftomorrowmovie.com
For downloadable general press information
please visit: https://mediapass.warnerbros.com/
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ABOUT THE PRODUCTION
CAGE
What I’m about to tell you sounds
crazy, but you have to listen to me.
Your very lives depend on it.
In “Edge of Tomorrow,” the world is at war with an indefatigable alien force no army, let alone individual, can conquer, and the greatest battle is still to come. Countless men and women will fight and all will be lost to these “Mimics,” unless the United Defense Force’s least likely recruit can succeed in employing a most implausible strategy: Live. Die. Repeat.
In the film, Tom Cruise plays Major William Cage, a military PR man who’s never been to the front line but who, thanks to his ill-advised threat to a four-star general, ends up trapped in an alien-induced time loop, fighting for his life…and death.
Director Doug Liman was drawn to the project by the extreme and extremely unusual circumstances in which Cage finds himself. “The concept of this really unique time loop hooked me in,” he says. “It opened everything up and created an opportunity to explore what was interesting about Tom’s character and to witness, day after day of the same day, what takes Cage to the brink. It also forces him to become not only the soldier, but the man, he has to be. When I find a project like this, that has a deeper meaning conveyed with tremendous action and great humor, that’s a movie I want to make.”
Cage’s unusual situation stems from his first—and seemingly last—battle with an alien. He quickly loses, and should lose his life, but has the unique ability to “reset” the day, waking once again in the exact location, at the exact moment, he did that morning. Justifiably, utterly confused, Cage can’t understand why no one else seems to be aware of the horrific events that already happened. Rather, they are prepping for the very fight they unknowingly have already lost.
Cruise says he was intrigued by these wholly unforeseen, highly undesirable circumstances and the way his character reacts to them. “The structure of the story and the way the time loop works allow the audience to come in, understand the rules, and then go right along with Cage on a constant accelerative progression. Even though he
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is living the same day over and over, it never feels the same because his behavior always changes; he always moves the action forward.”
Liman expands, “Everybody else is going to keep doing the same thing; the only thing Cage has control over are his own actions.”
Emily Blunt stars as the soldier who makes it possible for Cage to maintain that forward momentum: Sgt. Rita Vrataski, the resistance’s greatest warrior. “I was really excited to play someone as tough, badass and physically dangerous as Rita. But when I read the script, mixed in with this very cool story and intense action sequences I also found a lot of laughs, as well as incredible determination and perserverance of the human spirit.”
“Edge of Tomorrow” is based on the Japanese light novel All You Need is Kill, by author Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Producer Erwin Stoff was given the book by producer Tom Lassally, and immediately saw its potential as a film. “I knew it would make a fantastic large-scale feature,” Stoff recalls. “It’s exactly the kind of movie I love to make—big, exhilarating action with a really interesting narrative structure. I really liked the notion of someone being caught up in a war where the stakes are the very survival of humanity, and the character has to develop both the physical and emotional skillsets in order to make a difference.”
Producer Jason Hoffs, whose Viz Media published the novel in the U.S., says, “I love heroic stories, and this one also had an elegant three-act dramatic structure, so it lent itself beautifully to the big-screen form.”
The unexpected pairing of two people wholly reliant on one another, despite only one of them being able to remember they’ve ever met, allowed for a good deal of humor, especially between Cage and Rita. Screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie notes, “Cage begins as a self-serving media spin doctor who initially sees Rita as a means to an end. But she has unmatched combat experience and understands his situation better than he does—in short, she’s the key to ending his nightmare. Meanwhile, she starts every day wanting nothing to do with him.” Cage quickly realizes his usual charm won’t work on her, and he’ll have to find another way to win her over. “He must break through her carefully constructed emotional wall—over and over again.”
“I thought it was the most original screenplay about combat I had ever read,” remembers producer Jeffrey Silver. “I loved the really original way he keeps replaying
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the same day in this time loop, which often comes out in a very funny way, and I also felt it worked on the most basic, human level with characters who have a really unusual relationship.”
The story takes place primarily in London, Paris and the French coast and countryside. To capture the gritty, visceral, war-torn look the filmmakers envisioned, they shot nearly everything at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, making theirs the first production at the newly renovated studio lot.
One notable exception, occuring near the start of the film, is the arrival of Cage at the United Defense Force (UDF) headquarters. For the first time ever, a film company was permitted to land a helicopter in the middle of London’s iconic Trafalgar Square.
The next time Cage emerges from a helicopter, he is outfitted in the film’s distinctive battle armor: the ExoSuit. The uniquely constructed suits were among the film’s most striking design elements.
“I had the most amazing collaborators on this film,” Liman raves. “In terms of scale, this is the biggest film I’ve ever made. I’ve never made a sci-fi movie, or a story about time travel, and this one has both and a lot more. Both on and off screen, everyone was completely committed to taking chances and making the most compelling film possible, and I think it really shows.”
RITA
Come find me when you wake up.
When we first meet Major William Cage, he is a slick public relations officer in the U.S. army, a post he took up upon the demise of his career in advertising thanks to the global conflict. He’s never had an injury bigger than a papercut in his white-collar world, and can’t even stand the sight of blood. When he finds himself about to join the UDF troops on the battlefront of the final push in the war—ironically dubbed Operation Downfall—he is not just unprepared, he is terrified.
Cruise relished creating a real anti-hero, the ultimate underdog, a soldier with no possible means of surviving—let alone completing—his mission, and no real desire to. “Cage was a really fun character to play,” he says. “He’s in the military, but he’s not really a military guy; he’s the talking heads’ face of the war and he’s not the least bit
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heroic. In fact, he’s not even a reluctant hero, he’s a coward who’ll say anything to get out of the fight. And now he has to live through this bloody battle over and over. Every time he wakes up, his worst nightmare begins again.”
“Unlike Cage, Tom is fearless,” Liman says. “He will try anything, do anything. He threw himself into the part even when his character was being humiliated or killed in some crazy way. He cared so much about the movie and worked so hard, that in and of itself was inspiring to everyone around him.”
“I’ve wanted to work with Doug for a long time,” Cruise offers. “His films always have the kind of character journey that I enjoy. He’s able to maintain a tone and an intensity that keep you invested, and he imbues the drama or the action with a buoyancy and a tremendous amount of humanity and humor. I like to put everything of myself into my work and he does as well, making it great fun to collaborate with him every day.”
“Tom brings an unparalleled amount of effort and energy to his work,” Stoff says. “He has great chops and true athletic ability, and he comes with a full 360 degree view of how movies are made.”
Cage’s strange ability to turn the clock back only begins to make sense to him when he is able to partner with the one person who seems to understand: Sgt. Rita Vrataski. “Cage and Rita lead the charge together in this story,” Cruise allows. “It’s a total partnership; they may start out as unlikely allies, but they both discover they won’t survive without each other.”
“I’m committed to strong female characters, and I think Rita is the strongest in any of my films thus far,” Liman states. “She is a true veteran combatant who has led the charge and killed thousands of Mimics.”
For her heroics in previous battles, the media has crowned Rita the Angel of Verdun, while the troops refer to her as the Full Metal Bitch. “Now, she must also be a mentor to Cage,” the director continues, “training him to be as strong a fighter as she herself is, or they’ll have no hope of winning the day. Emily came to the table with incredible strength of character and was every inch the warrior Rita was reputed to be.”
Blunt notes that, despite Cage having enlisted Rita to help him, “she’s really using him because he’s able to reset the day, and she sees this as an invaluable
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weapon. Through his experiences, she can change tactics in order to get further along each time and hopefully go on to survive the battle and then win the war.”
The story’s conceit of replaying the day posed one of the more unusual tasks Blunt faced in portraying Rita who, each new day, doesn’t remember Cage or anything that happened; he has to start over with her every time he starts the day again.
“She was always meeting Cage for the first time, so building a character whose interactions with another existed in an environment that was essentially the same again and again made it a challenge to progress the relationship,” she relates. “How does she change toward him, how does their familiarty grow if she can’t remember him? It was tricky for me to play that and to find the right measure of intimacy.”
Cruise also found the one-sided relationship in the film to be interesting to play: “Cage comes to care for her, but she can’t reciprocate—for her, it’s always just been that one day. That added a great layer to the connection between the two that was really fun to explore.”
Liman’s style of directing aided Blunt in conveying even the subtlest of alterations in her character. “Doug was exhilarating to work with, I never knew what he was going to throw at me or what shot he’d want to try next, and that made it possible for me to really find the different layers in Rita,” she says. “He also veers away from things ever looking too perfected or glossy; instead, there’s a messiness and a humanity that allow him to capture very spontaneous moments, and I think audiences can feel the truth in that.”
Liman felt she and Cruise hit the mark. “Both Tom and Emily are fantastic actors. Despite all the dramatic elements surrounding the story, many of the film’s more humorous moments come from their great chemistry together.”
“Emily was terrific,” Cruise adds. “I love what she did with Rita, it was perfect for this journey. You see and feel her humanity, and it’s quite moving. On top of that, Emily’s never done action, but you’d never know it. She was thrown into the deep end and it was no easy feat, but she was wonderfully uncompromising. She’s just a brilliant actress and she has a great wit. It was a pleasure to work with her.”
The admiration was mutual. Blunt offers, “I’ve never met anyone with such a commitment to making the best movie he can. Tom strived for the best version of every moment, every scene, every day. He played Cage in a way that wasn’t at all
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whiny or tedious; even though the character was useless and inept at first, he tried. I think that makes him all the more compelling to watch.”
FARELL
Private Cage is a deserter. I am making you all
personally responsible for his deliverance.
He will be combat ready at oh-six-hunny tomorrow.
J Squad
Following his altercation with the brass at headquarters, Cage finds himself at Heathrow Airport in London, which has been commandeered by the UDF as military headquarters. One quick look around him tells him something has gone terribly wrong, and no amount of slick PR language will get him out of the mess that it got him into in the first place. Railroaded by his superiors, he is now under the command of Master Sgt. Farell, a military man through and through, who deflects Cage’s every attempt to wriggle out of his new assignment.
Tasked with shaping up Cage, whom he is informed is a private attempting to desert, Farell oversees the J Squad, Cage’s new company of misfits. Bill Paxton plays the proud, lifelong GI eager to lead his team into combat.
“Sergeant Farell is getting his troops ready for a massive counter-attack in France that he believes is the last stand in preventing the aliens from annihilating mankind. When I read the script, what impressed me most was the imagination, the scope and scale of the story,” Paxton says. “My character says, ‘There is no courage without fear.’ One doesn’t exist without the other. To me, that is the crux of the story. However, despite the life-and-death situation, there are moments of humor and levity.”
Resembling a collection of ex-cons, J Squad is comprised of six disconnected, dysfunctional soldiers: Skinner, Kimmel, Griff, Ford, Kuntz and Nance. Says Silver, “The J Squad looks like the last group you’d think of bringing into the war with you, but they’re pretty gung-ho to get into the fight.”
Jonas Armstrong plays Skinner, a street-smart Brit who dislikes Cage from the moment they meet, going so far as to pick a fight with him. The actor was given little time to prepare for the scene, which was actually added on the day it was shot. “I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry,” he recalls. “An immediate panic flew into me
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because all I could think was, ‘What if I punch one of the biggest film stars on the planet?’ I was nervous, but Tom was super and made it all so easy. He told me to be as aggressive as I could. It turned out to be one of my best experiences of the whole shoot.”
Tony Way is Kimmel. Not the most athletic of the bunch, Kimmel, Way says, “overcompensates for that. I think he realizes he wouldn’t have made it this far in the war if he wasn’t doing something right, though.” Right or wrong, Kimmel also chooses to go mostly “commando” into battle. “He provides some comic relief in some intense situations,” the actor grins.
Griff is an eccentric guy who offers his opinion freely, even when he’s not asked for it. Kick Gurry, who plays the role, says, “He is probably the guy you want to fight next to, because he’s a total nut job. So, he’s either gonna get killed, or save your life.”
Dragomir Mrsic plays the silent but observant Kuntz, a soldier of few words who is ready and willing to fight to the finish. Mrsic notes, “Kuntz says it all with his expressions. War affects people in strange ways, and Doug thought it would be effective if he didn’t speak. Cage doesn’t know what to make of him.”
Ford, the youngest member of J Squad, is a thug who thinks he knows it all. Unlike his character, actor Franz Drameh was eager to pick up what he could from the veteran actors on set, especially Cruise. “I’ve always been a fan of Tom’s,” he says. “It was great to observe his amazing work ethic and passion. He is so efficient; I was able to learn a lot from just watching him.”
The lone woman in J Squad, Nance, is played by Charlotte Riley. With a broken nose and browned teeth, the actress is almost unrecognizable. “Nance is in a male-dominated world, but she lets the guys know she is just as tough as they are, if not more so,” Riley remarks. To take her character’s offbeat looks even further, Riley says she “decided to grow my eyebrows into these fab `80s bushy brows. So that, along with my dreadlocks, allowed me to feel a real transformation in becoming Nance.”
“In a relatively limited amount of screen time, the actors who make up the J Squad all created very distinct personalities,” Liman says. “I think the audience will be rooting for them.”
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Before Cage ever finds himself thrown in the barracks with the lowliest of the enlisted troops, he makes the grave miscalculation that lands him there by getting on the wrong side of a four-star commander, General Brigham.
“Because Cage has done such a good PR job spinning the war, General Brigham—played brilliantly by Brendan Gleeson—wants him reporting from ground zero, giving people around the world a window onto the battleground,” Cruise explains. “He wants everything positioned so this so-called turning point comes off well in the public eye.”
Unfortunately for Cage, in trying to turn down what he perceives as the general’s request, he takes a very bad turn and proceeds to anger and offend him instead, setting off events that will alter Cage’s life—and everyone else’s—forever, one way or another.
CAGE
I’m not a soldier.
RITA
Of course you’re not. You’re a weapon.
As if preparing for a real battle, Cruise and Blunt started training well in advance of the start of principal photography on “Edge of Tomorrow.” According to Liman, “Tom and Emily began working out months ahead of shooting. They both took it very seriously. The first day of shooting, they were both ready for the action the film required, and that is a dream come true for any director.”
Nevertheless, Blunt says, “You can train all you want, run a million miles, and I don’t think anything quite prepares you. You just have to get used to it. And it’s hard. Rita’s fight style is very aerial-based—lots of sliding under alien tentacles, jumping, flipping over them, slicing as she’s in the air. We wanted it to look intense, but yet there was a kind of beauty to it. Trying to capture the choreography and the sheer skill with which she fights was a tremendous challenge.”
“It was incredibly demanding,” Cruise admits. “And on top of it, at times I was shooting seven days a week, going between first and second unit.”
Stunt coordinator Wade Eastwood choreographed the exceedingly intricate fight sequences executed throughout the film by Cruise, Blunt and the rest of the cast, as
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well as trained them to do the stunts. Training was not only vital because of the specifics of the action, but also due to how the actors would be outfitted for battle.
In conceiving and executing the armor and weaponry the soldiers would wear in battle, Liman was very specific with production designer Oliver Scholl and costume designer Kate Hawley: any creative leap of armor technology had to appear obtainable in the near future, similar to what defense programs around the world are exploring today.
Liman elaborates, “We were looking for something high tech, but in the style that the military would arrive at. The military is not trying to sell their product to anyone, so they have a much more utilitarian approach and attitude to design. That is how I wanted the armor to look, simplified and raw, not like something sleek.” The result was the unforgettable look and feel of the multi-purpose ExoSuit.
Liman also wanted the suit to expose the human form so the characters could be seen in them, not covered up by them. And, because the cast would need to run, fight, jump and crawl in them, it needed to be designed as a moveable, articulated piece of sophisticated puppetry, operated solely by the actor wearing it. The suit would look real because it was.
Scholl and his team developed various ExoSuit concepts, working in tandem with head ExoSuit builder Pierre Bohanna to ensure form and function: initial 2D and 3D concept art led to an aluminum prototype frame with variable hinges and pivot points to determine what the rules of the suit were. Hawley then collaborated with the team on the aesthetic details and proportions of the suits, the color palettes and surface treatments. Careful integration was needed between the costume and art departments and props to provide unity, practicality and continuity between the ExoSuits and the weaponry.
The end result complemented the multiple axes of human joints, so they were able to move and bend as the body does. A foam mock-up was sculpted on top of the frame, then presented to Cruise.
Cruise relates, “I came in a couple of months before we started and did a lot of R&D on the ExoSuit, just the frame of which weighed 60 to 100 pounds and, depending on the armament, could go up to anywhere from 120 to 125. It was a real test of mind
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over matter, something you never fully conquered. But that worked perfectly for the character.”
When creating the ExoSuit and battle fatigues for Cage, Hawley and Cruise collaborated from the get go. Says Hawley, “As well as constantly adapting the suit practically to support Tom’s performance, one of things Tom said was he wanted his armor to evoke the imagery of a war painting or war photography, where there is a bleak, heroic romance to it and, at times, humanity.”
Scholl, Hawley, Cruise and the ExoSuit team went through great pains perfecting the suit. From the helmet to the footwear, everything had to sync up, especially because Cruise, Blunt and many of the other actors were performing their own stunts.
Seventy hard material ExoSuits were handcrafted during filming; 50 soft material suits were also made. Every ExoSuit was manufactured on site from 200 hand-cast components. At the peak of ExoSuit production, the casting workshop was creating 650 components per day, including 170 parts, such as nuts, bolts and screws, which were used to complete each one. Each piece would come out of the mold shop and go into the fabricating shop where they were sanded, painted and cleaned up. There were three different types—grunts, tanks and dogs—and each one had weapons integrated into the design, from the dogs’ rocket-launching guns that appear as if they are wings emerging from the suit to grenade launchers, and from the tanks’ huge machine guns to the grunts’ smaller pistols.
“Just building the ExoSuits alone took four to five months,” Liman says, “so once we committed to a design, we couldn’t come up with a new idea and expect it to happen any time soon.
“Tom got the first ExoSuit off the assembly line,” he continues. “He had already been training with weights to get used to carrying around the weight of the suit. It was all the tiny performance details that made it believable—even when you are just walking in the suit, you are performing. In the movie the suit is moving the human, but in reality the human is moving the suit.”
“The ExoSuit created for Rita had to feel different from the other soldiers. Rita is a crusader, heroic beyond belief, but at the same time beautiful,” Hawley says. “We wanted to avoid anything ‘girly’ when creating her look, or that cat-suit sort of thing that can feel too ‘fantasy.’ She had to have her own swagger and language that set her
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apart from the others and that was more personal, and that had to come across in the costume, like the rotor blade from a fallen helicopter that is her weapon of choice. She has a Joan of Arc quality about her, so we sprayed red slash marks on the chest of her suit—a nod to the novel—as if to say she had been to hell and back and lived to tell about it.”
Blunt states, “Rita doesn’t even wear a helmet in the film because she knows it’s not going to help her. Now that is one tough lady. And there was something quite empowering about putting on that armor and marching along with 20 enormous guys behind me.”
Putting the ExoSuits on the cast members was no easy feat. Each actor had his or her own personal team of four ExoSuit handlers who would strap the armor onto them. Cruise made it his personal mission to cut down the time it took to get into the suit. “When we were testing it out, it would take about 30 minutes to get me in it,” he cites. “If you have to take it off for any reason, that’s 30 minutes we’re not in production. So I told the team that by the time we started shooting, we were gonna be under a minute. I literally got stopwatches and started timing it. It became like a contest. And they did it; they got it down to 30 seconds.”
When Hiroshi Sakurazaka, author of All You Need is Kill, visited the set during filming, Cruise suggested he try on one of the ExoSuits. “I didn’t really have the physique or the stamina to carry the suit on my back,” Sakurazaka relates. “I could barely walk in it, let alone act or do anything else. Doug Liman put me in a scene as an extra, wearing the ExoSuit, and after just standing there for ten takes I was exhausted!”
Says Hawley, “Creating a fully-functioning ExoSuit was such a complicated process, but in the end we were all incredibly proud of the work we did. The intricacies were mind blowing. ‘Form follows function’ was the lesson we learned in the end.”
For the everyday fatigues, Hawley incorporated the traditions of British officers, personalizing each in the manner each character might adapt their uniform to make it their own—Rita’s Doc Marten boots, Griff’s shirt and Kimmel’s teddy bear. She also incorporated logo arm designs from battles past, giving them a battered, bruised and broken-down look that was in stark contrast to the uniformed military personnel who didn’t venture beyond their office walls. And, because the entire globe is at war with the Mimics, fatigues and uniforms had to have an international feel. Hawley sourced
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from around the world, intersecting designs and then unifying them with the United Defense Force branding featured on clothing and props throughout the film.
Since the world of “Edge of Tomorrow” exists in a continual time loop, Hawley and her team faced additional continuity challenges. “Many times on set we would be asking each other, ‘What loop are we in again?’” she laughs. “So in a way, art imitating life sort of took over, sort of like Tom’s character.”
CAGE
The invasion will fail, along with every
soldier you send in. We lose everything.
When Scholl first met with the filmmakers to discuss the overall look of the film, they stressed that, despite it being a movie about war and alien invasion, they didn’t want it to be apocalyptic. Scholl conveys, “We wanted it to be clear that there was still a world left to be saved.”
Liman, a fan of classic World War II movies, sought to evoke that era while still creating a somewhat futuristic world for a contemporary audience. Therefore, Scholl created an environment that provides hints that it is not present day, as evidenced by some of the technology, but yet still feels familiar. For what amounts in the film to a two-day period, albeit relived again and again, the design team would create 47 sets—27 exteriors and 20 interiors. And as the story takes place in the time loop, many of the sets were redressed or redesigned to correspond to the appropriate loop.
The entire film was shot in England, primarily at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden. In addition to the facility’s nine soundstages, which offer more than 1,000,000 square feet of stage space, there is a 100-acre backlot, making Leavesden the ideal place to create a large-scale beach invasion, a Heathrow Airport-based military compound complete with an interior combat range and drop ship, and a nearly deconstructed Louvre, among other sets or backdrops.
The Beach
The 650-foot long by 500-foot wide backlot was nothing more than a vast grassy field until the “Edge of Tomorrow” team got hold of it. The challenge was to create a beach reminiscent of Normandy, circa World War II. It took four months. The site was
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first bulldozed, and then 1300 tons of sand was shipped in. Holes and trenches were meticulously dug to create a battlefield, with input from Wade Eastwood’s stunt department, who were designing the action sequences that would take place there.
The special effects department rigged the ground and sand for the battle explosions; it was especially difficult to keep the sand from turning to mud with all the moisture in the air, so set dressers had to constantly churn the sand to keep it fresh. Scattered among the pitted and trenched sand were fuselage and debris.
Surrounding this huge set was an 1800-foot green screen, which would later be replaced by extended environments that depicted the massive landscape and shoreline, along with 100,000 troops fighting in battle with the Mimics. The skies would be filled with military planes, drop ships, hover crafts, helicopters and missiles. To cover all the action, cinematographer Dion Beebe often had nine cameras going at once.
“Dion is an amazing talent and an incredible collaborator,” Liman underscores. “He is one of the best DPs I’ve ever worked with and I would do it again in a heartbeat.”
The beach involved very complicated work. Liman allows, “We were probably on that beach for 35 days of the shoot, and the last day was right before Christmas. Now, England is rainy, we all know that, but we showed up and our beach was covered in snow. Jeff Silver, our incredible line producer, turned to me and said, ‘Maybe Mother Nature is telling us it’s time to move on from the beach.’”
The Base
The filmmakers scouted Heathrow Airport in order to determine what they could and could not film there, according to airport regulations and the needs of the production. Heathrow was incredibly accommodating, but it is one of the busiest airports in the world, so the filmmakers decided it would be in their best interest to build a part of the airport themselves.
New skins were put up on the surfaces of the buildings at Leavesden, jet ways built, safety and traffic markings on the ground duplicated. Specialists from Heathrow worked closely with the art department and construction team to replicate the Heathrow tarmac.
The airport set was so large, most of the cast and crew used golf carts to get around. However, Liman recollects that not everyone felt the need to. “We were doing
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a scene with Tom and the actors from J Squad and about 40 extras, which called for them to jog from one end to the other, and when they got to the far end we’d cut, and they’d have to come back to reset. It was pretty far, but Tom just took off running. And suddenly 60 people were following him, racing back to the first position so that, instead of it taking five minutes to reset for the second shot, it took about 30 seconds. In fact, Tom beat the golf cart with the camera.”
To turn the airport into a military base, they lined the area with army tents that would serve as a base of operations for the soldiers. Real military grade tents were used to dress the set.
The interior combat range where Rita trains Cage to fight the Mimics was comprised of huge pieces of blasted, bullet-ridden concrete. Built inside a massive soundstage, this set was designed to have an industrial feel to it, and was one of the few sets in the movie where bright colors like red, yellow and orange were used. Most notably, the colors were used on the visually arresting, claw-like, steel “mock” Mimics used in fight training. The brighter palette, when compared to the monochromatic grays and khakis used throughout the rest of the film, was intended to subtly indicate the high alert level during this tumultuous wartime, as well as show the potential toxicity of the environment.
However, before he’s put in a moment of actual training, Cage is sent into battle with the rest of J Squad on a drop ship that flies them over the coastline and from which they literally drop via cables onto the sand. Scholl came up with the sophisticated design for the drop ship, which in exterior shots resembles a mix between an Osprey tilt-rotor and Chinook helicopter. He was excited when it became a reality due to a joint effort of special effects supervisor Dominic Tuohy and construction manager Paul Hayes, whose teams built and rigged the set, and Nick Davis, whose VFX team would later composite the ship’s trap doors to open and drop the soldiers into battle, as well as duplicate the exterior of thousands of ships in flight.
On the practical set, the actors, in the ExoSuits, were actually hooked up to cables and dropped through the floor onto safety mattresses 15 feet below. The set was also rigged with hydraulics so it could shake and rock back and forth in the manner of a flight simulator. The cast endured a week of filming in this claustrophobic
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environment, clipped into a brace in their weighty ExoSuits, their feet dangling beneath them.
Paris
For the film’s scenes in wartime Paris—all shot at Leavesden—Scholl designed a landmark in ruins: the Louvre. The visitors’ center set had been blown to bits; huge concrete slabs had fallen atop dirt, debris and human remains; the rails of an escalator, that looked like it had been snapped in half, lead to nowhere, creating the illusion it was half above ground, and half below. Six operating waterfalls were built on the set to show the ongoing flood in the aftermath. And, as a nod to Sakurazaka’s original novel, they included Japanese signage advertising an exhibit that had taken place at the museum before the alien invasion had begun.
One full side of the set was a green screen—the background environment would be extended by the VFX department to show the streets of Paris, utilizing previously shot scenic plate footage.
For a pivotal scene set on the Champs-Élysées, the company braved below-freezing temperatures to shoot nights on Scholl’s Place de la Concorde backlot set. At 250 feet wide by 250 feet long, the newly constructed tank set was six inches deep and held 23 thousand gallons of water. Surrounding the set was a 28-foot tall green screen. It featured statues and iron gates in the same décor of the actual Place, and a keen eye will spot portions of Cleopatra’s Needle as abandoned blown-out cars float by in the flooded street.
The production also ventured out of Leavesden. Visual effects plates were shot at Heathrow Airport, Saunton Sands beaches in Devon, and inside a car park in Vauxhall. Driving shots were orchestrated in Barton Stacey, Lavant Road in Sussex, and on the Millbrook racetrack, known for its state-of-the-art vehicular testing.
Cast and crew filmed in a variety of practical locations, including the Ministry of Defense Building at Whitehall and Horse Guards Avenue; Waterloo Bridge; a 1690s English Heritage farmhouse on 22 acres in Petersfield; the Coach & Horses Pub in Farringdon; and The Mall by Hyde Park. And, in what would be an extraordinary moment for all involved, “Edge of Tomorrow” would make movie-making history in Trafalgar Square.
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Trafalgar Square
During an early production meeting, says Stoff, “Tom said, ‘Wouldn’t it be a cool way to open the film with a helicopter flying over the Thames and landing in Trafalgar Square?’ At that point, I looked over to our location manager, Sue Quinn, who had gone pale,” he laughs.
Landing a helicopter in Trafalgar Square was a privilege that had never been granted to anyone in the past, apart from the British military, and only then in case of an emergency. Fortunately, the filmmakers had the support of London Mayor Boris Johnson. The Mayor’s office worked in collaboration with the Greater London Authority, The Westminster Council, Transport for London, the Charing Cross Police Department, the Mounted Police, the Horse Guards, London Underground, The National Gallery and other authorities to execute the sequence.
In addition, the production’s location department hand delivered 8,000 letters to businesses and residences within 700 meters of Trafalgar Square in order to assure all were aware of the intended shooting plans.
On the day of filming, the famous fountains in Trafalgar Square were turned off. Beebe’s team had placed 11 cameras on the ground and on rooftops to capture the scene. The police locked down the area and all traffic was diverted from Trafalgar Square. No detail was left to chance.
The RAF Puma Eurocopter used for shooting was based on the other side of the Thames, at the Oval Cricket Ground. From there, Cruise boarded the chopper and rode it up the river, past the London Eye, Tower Bridge, Big Ben, and up Whitehall to land in Trafalgar Square. The main helicopter was followed by another Eurocopter that had a camera mounted on it to shoot the aerials. For several of the takes, Doug Liman was inside the helicopter with Cruise, operating the camera himself.
Cruise reflects, “Landing a helicopter in Trafalgar Square was one of those exceptionally cool moments in a career spent in locations all around the world. We all got really excited to do it, and it was terrific that Doug got in to shoot me live for the beginning. It was great fun for all of us.”
“Shutting Trafalgar Square down and landing a massive Royal Air Force helicopter was one of those moments where you’re like a kid again,” Liman beams.
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“From a technical point of view, it was by far the most challenging thing I’ve ever done in my career, because we had three hours to do everything, no ability to rehearse it on-site, and once it’s hovering on the ground, it renders any form of communication impossible because it’s so loud. And we only had that morning, so what you get is what you get. If you need one more minute, you’re never getting it. I thought to myself, ‘This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity; make the most of it.’”
CAGE
We are not equipped for what’s out there.
“Edge of Tomorrow” takes place during the final push in a global war against a seemingly impenetrable infestation of a hive-like alien race that has chosen to inhabit and take over Earth. The visual effects team had their work cut out for them.
“I’d worked with visual effects before—though hopefully audiences wouldn’t necessarily have noticed,” Liman smiles. “But I’d never done a film where any of the central characters were comprised entirely of visual effects, especially ones that have to fully interact with the actors.”
Liman had the benefit of working with visual effects supervisor Nick Davis. “Nick and I spent hundreds of hours figuring out alien movements, fight styles, everything. And he didn’t just speak effects, he spoke story. I knew this project was going to be a crazy marriage of the real world, characters and action with a CG world, characters and action, and Nick really helped guide me through that process.”
Davis says, “Right from the get go decisions had to be made, due to the complexity of the battle sequences.”
Liman admits to “agonizing over the Mimics in order to make sure that they were specific entities with their own attributes. I never want to waste an opportunity to bring something interesting to life, especially my villains. So I had to approach the alien designs with that in mind.”
The design of the Mimic was an ongoing and evolving process. Creating an original-looking alien was the real challenge. Says Stoff, “It’s harder than you think to come up with something new, and then when you do, you run the risk that it sort of feels random, not organic to your film. So, what we basically did was to really work on
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the story behind the Mimics. When your design gets driven by story, you’re on much surer ground.”
The team decided that the Mimics would have multiple tendrils that would come loose from their body during battle, like a javelin. But how would the Mimics move? What texture would they be? The filmmakers began their research and development for the Mimics, doing movement and animation studies. They had to determine how the Mimics and their human opponents would interact in combat.
“All of the varied types of Mimics have different personality traits,” Davis continues. “Some are four-legged with tentacles that sort of spray off of them. Others move with incredible speed and dexterity. But they are all out to kill—an enemy whose speed and brutality are unmatched.”
Blunt, along with many of her cast mates, had to execute numerous fight scenes against a green screen, with combatants that weren’t actually there. “It took some getting used to, hurtling around on wires, swinging a huge sword but never actually impacting anything,” she recalls.
VFX houses, including Framestore in London and Montreal and Sony Pictures Imageworks in Los Angeles, lent a hand at the creature design. The pivotal scenes involving Mimics were meticulously sketched out by VFX artists in pre-viz prior to shooting. On the set, on any given day, the VFX department had a team of six data wranglers capturing data and textures that were used as reference materials when creating the shots in post-production. Using digital video and high-resolution digital stills, the wranglers captured all the light and information on set, so that the computer artists could later recreate the same environment.
“One of our goals was to create VFX shots that were photo-realistic, so an audience member can’t tell where the practical shot footage ends, and the VFX extension begins,” Davis states.
For the final pieces of post-production, Liman worked with composer Christophe Beck, who created a score that captured the suspense, the action and the fun of Cage and Rita’s extraordinary journey.
“When I find a project that has a deeper meaning and, at the same time is an unbelievable rollercoaster ride that will have action sequences audiences have never
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seen before, character-driven comedy, and is just an all-around great time, of course I want to make that movie immediately,” Liman affirms.
# # #
ABOUT THE CAST
TOM CRUISE (Cage) has achieved extraordinary success as an actor, producer, and philanthropist in a career spanning over three decades. He is a three-time Academy Award® nominee and three-time Golden Globe Award winner whose films have earned in excess of eight billion dollars worldwide—an incomparable accomplishment. Seventeen of Cruise’s films have grossed more than $100 million in the United States alone, and 20 have grossed over $200 million globally.
Since he first appeared on screen in the 1981 films “Endless Love” and “Taps,” Cruise’s versatility has been evidenced by the varied films and roles he chooses. He has made 37 films, had a producing role on 18, and worked with a remarkable list of acclaimed film directors, including Harold Becker, Francis Ford Coppola, Paul Brickman, Ridley Scott, Tony Scott, Martin Scorsese, Barry Levinson, Oliver Stone, Ron Howard, Rob Reiner, Sydney Pollack, Neil Jordan, Brian de Palma, Cameron Crowe, Stanley Kubrick, Paul Thomas Anderson, John Woo, Steven Spielberg, Michael Mann, J.J. Abrams, Robert Redford, Ben Stiller, Bryan Singer, James Mangold, Brad Bird and Adam Shankman.
“Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol” opened to critical acclaim in December 2011 and went on to gross close to 700 million dollars, making it the biggest box office success of Cruise’s career. Combined, the “Mission: Impossible” franchise has brought in more than two billion dollars worldwide since Cruise conceived the idea for the films and began producing them, also starring in all four films as the legendary spy Ethan Hunt.
Most recently, Cruise starred in Joseph Kosinski’s “Oblivion,” based on the director’s original graphic novel; in Christopher McQuarrie’s suspense thriller “Jack Reacher,” based on the Lee Child book One Shot, from his hugely successful series
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about a former military policeman-turned-drifter; and in Shankman’s adaptation of the hit stage musical “Rock of Ages.”
In 2010, Cruise starred with Cameron Diaz in the romantic action-comedy “Knight and Day.” Two years earlier, Cruise portrayed German officer Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg in the critically acclaimed worldwide hit “Valkyrie,” an historical thriller about the attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler during World War II, which grossed $200 million globally, making it one of the top five WWII-themed films of all time. Cruise also appeared in Ben Stiller’s comedy smash “Tropic Thunder,” as the hip-hopping, foul-mouthed Hollywood movie mogul Les Grossman. This performance, based on a character he created, earned him praise from critics and audiences, as well as his seventh Golden Globe Award nomination.
Cruise received Academy Award® nominations for Best Actor for “Born on the Fourth of July” and “Jerry Maguire,” in addition to a Best Supporting Actor Oscar® nomination for “Magnolia.” He also garnered three Golden Globe Awards, including Best Actor wins for “Born on the Fourth of July” and “Jerry Maguire,” and one for Best Supporting Actor for “Magnolia,” as well as nominations for his roles in “Risky Business,” “A Few Good Men,” and “The Last Samurai.” In addition, Cruise has earned acting nominations and awards from BAFTA, the Screen Actors Guild®, the Chicago Film Critics Association, and the National Board of Review.
His list of memorable credits also includes such diverse films as “Collateral,” “Minority Report,” “Interview with the Vampire,” “The Firm,” “Rain Man,” “The Color of Money” and “Top Gun.”
Cruise has also been honored with tributes ranging from Harvard’s Hasty Pudding Man of the Year Award, to the John Huston Award from the Artists Rights Foundation, and the American Cinematheque Award for Distinguished Achievement in Film.
While continuing to explore new artistic challenges, Cruise has used his professional success as a vehicle for positive change, becoming an international advocate, activist and philanthropist in the fields of health, education and human rights. He has been honored by the Mentor-LA organization for his work on behalf of the children of Los Angeles and around the world, and in May 2011, he received the Simon Wiesenthal Humanitarian Award. In June of 2012, he received the Entertainment Icon
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Award from the Friars Club for his outstanding accomplishments in the entertainment industry and in the humanities. He is the fourth person to receive this honor after Douglas Fairbanks, Cary Grant and Frank Sinatra.
EMILY BLUNT (Rita) is a Golden Globe-winning actress whose transformative ability and versatile performances make her one of the most in demand actresses of today. Blunt rose to international prominence with her outstanding performances in films such as “My Summer of Love,” for which she received a British Independent Film Award nomination, as well as “The Devil Wears Prada,” for which she received Golden Globe Award and BAFTA nominations.
Blunt will next be seen in Rob Marshall’s film adaptation of the musical “Into the Woods.” Blunt is The Baker’s Wife in the film, which is scheduled to be released this Christmas. This summer, Blunt will begin production on the thriller “Sicario,” alongside Benicio del Toro, for director Denis Villeneuve.
Recently, Blunt appeared in Lynn Shelton’s “My Sister’s Sister”; alongside Ewan McGregor in Lasse Hallström’s “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen,” for which she earned a Golden Globe nomination; as the female lead in the time-travel thriller “Looper,” alongside Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt; and opposite Colin Firth in the dark comedy “Arthur Newman.”
Her other notable films include “Charlie Wilson’s War,” “Sunshine Cleaning” and “The Wolfman.” Blunt played the title role of Queen Victoria in the critically acclaimed film “The Young Victoria,” for which she received British Independent Film Award and Golden Globe nominations. Her additional credits include “Gulliver’s Travels” and “The Adjustment Bureau.”
Blunt started her career at the 2002 Chichester Festival, where she played Juliet in a production of “Romeo and Juliet.” Her London stage debut was a production of “The Royal Family,” opposite Dame Judi Dench. On the small screen, she won a Golden Globe Award for her work in the BBC television movie “Gideon’s Daughter.”
BILL PAXTON (Master Sergeant Farell) continues to make quality films both in front of and behind the camera. He can currently be seen in “Million Dollar Arm,” opposite Jon Hamm, in the story of a sports agent who stages an unconventional recruitment strategy to get talented cricket players to play Major League Baseball.
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Paxton will soon begin directing the big screen adaptation of Joe Lansdale’s “The Bottoms.” The Edgar Award-winning, racially themed novel is set in East Texas and follows an adolescent boy, his little sister and their father, who stumble across the body of an African American woman who has been savagely mutilated and left to die in the bottom of the Sabine River. The adaptation is written by Brent Hanley, who penned Paxton’s 2001 directing effort, “Frailty.” Shooting is planned for later this year.
Production recently wrapped on “Term Life,” in which he stars opposite Vince Vaughn. Peter Billingsley directed the adaptation of the Image Comics character Nick Barrow. Paxton also recently finished production on “Nightcrawler,” a thriller, opposite Jake Gyllenhaal and Rene Russo; the film marks Dan Gilroy’s directing debut, from his own script about a driven young man who discovers the nocturnal world of freelance crime journalism in Los Angeles.
Paxton was most recently seen in Baltarsar Kormakur’s “Two Guns,” alongside Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg.
On the small screen, Paxton starred in the acclaimed History Channel miniseries “Hatfields & McCoys,” with Kevin Costner. The show set a ratings record as the top-rated entertainment telecast ever for ad-supported basic cable. Paxtib was nominated for an Emmy Award and a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® for his work. Paxton was also honored with three Golden Globe Award nominations for his work on HBO’s critically acclaimed series “Big Love,” in which he starred opposite Jeanne Tripplehorn, Chloë Sevigny and Ginnifer Goodwin, and a Golden Globe nomination for his performance in HBO’s “A Bright Shining Lie.”
Paxton can currently be seen in a guest-starring arc on ABC’s hit “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” He is also currently production in Mexico on the History Channel miniseries “Texas Rising.” The eight-hour project—which reteams him with the producers of “Hatfields & McCoys”—explores the revolution against Mexico and the rise of the legendary Texas Rangers. Paxton plays Sam Houston, the father of Texas, opposite Brendan Fraser and Ray Liotta.
Paxton recently produced his first graphic novel, 7 Holes for Air. Written by John J. McLaughlin, with art by Mick Reinman, the graphic novels follows the life of Bob Rourke, a tough, hard-living, 50-year-old steelworker.
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After gaining critical attention in the John Hughes comedy “Weird Science” and James Cameron’s sci-fi pic “Aliens,” Paxton’s performance as the small-town sheriff in Carl Franklin’s “One False Move” marked his emergence as a leading man. He went on to star in a host of blockbusters, including Stephen Soderbergh’s action thriller “Haywire”; “Tombstone”; “True Lies”; “Apollo 13”; “Twister”; “Mighty Joe Young”; Cameron’s “Titanic”; “A Simple Plan”; “U-571”; and “Vertical Limit.”
Paxton segued his on-camera experience into becoming a feature film director when, in 2001, he helmed the gothic thriller “Frailty,” in which he also starred, alongside Matthew McConaughey. “Frailty” was honored with the National Board of Review 2002 special mention for excellence in filmmaking. In 2005, he directed the sports drama “The Greatest Game Ever Played,” starring Shia LaBeouf. Additionally, Paxton served as a producer on the films “Parkland,” “The Good Life,” and “Traveler,” which he starred in, along with Mark Wahlberg and Julianna Margulies.
Paxton began his career as a set dresser on producer Roger Corman’s “Big Bad Mama” in the mid-1970s. After working in the art department on several features, he moved to New York to study acting with Stella Adler. Returning to Los Angeles in 1980, he met James Cameron while moonlighting as a set dresser on the low-budget sci-fi movie “Galaxy of Terror.” Subsequently, he landed acting jobs in the films “Mortuary” and “Night Warning,” and earned a cult following for his work in such movies as “Near Dark,” “Boxing Helena,” “The Dark Backwards,” and “Broken Lizard’s Club Dread.” His other credits include “The Colony,” “Trespass,” “Indian Summer,” “The Evening Star,” “Streets of Fire,” “Frank & Jesse,” “Navy Seals,” “Predator 2,” “The Vagrant” and “Pass the Ammo.”
In addition to his awards for acting and directing, Paxton holds the distinction as the only actor to have visited the wreckage site of the Titanic with James Cameron, for the documentary “Ghosts of the Abyss.” Paxton completed four descents to the site, two-and-one-half miles below the surface of the North Atlantic.
BRENDAN GLEESON (General Brigham) starred this year as a priest in John Michael McDonagh’s “Calvary,” which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. He also starred in the writer/director’s “The Guard,” with Don Cheadle, and more recently played roles in the comedy “The Grand Seduction,” the worldwide box office hit “The Smurfs 2,” and in Robert Redford’s “The Company You Keep.” He will be seen this year in Ron
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Howard’s “Heart of the Sea,” and Brad Anderson’s “Eliza Graves.” Most recently he wrapped on Sarah Gavron’s “Suffragette,” and he will soon begin filming Adam Smith’s “Trespass Against Us,” with Michael Fassbender.
Gleeson is well known to audiences around the world for his portrayal of Alastor “Mad-Eye” Moody in three of the “Harry Potter” films: “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.” He received Golden Globe, BAFTA Award and British Independent Film Award nominations for his performance in Martin McDonagh’s “In Bruges,” and also won an Emmy and received a Golden Globe nomination for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in the 2009 HBO movie “Into the Storm.”
Gleeson made his feature film debut in Jim Sheridan’s “The Field,” followed by small roles in such films as Mike Newell’s “Into the West” and Ron Howard’s “Far and Away.” He first gained attention for his performance in Mel Gibson’s Oscar®-winning Best Picture “Braveheart.” He went on to appear in Neil Jordan’s films “Michael Collins” and “The Butcher Boy,” and starred in the independent film “Angela Mooney,” executive produced by John Boorman.
In 1998, Boorman directed Gleeson in the role of real-life Irish folk hero Martin Cahill in the biopic “The General.” For his performance, Gleeson won several acting honors, including the London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor. He has since collaborated with John Boorman on the films “The Tailor of Panama,” “In My Country” and “The Tiger’s Tail.”
Gleeson’s additional film credits include John Woo’s “Mission: Impossible II”; “Harrison’s Flowers”; “Wild About Harry”; Steven Spielberg’s “A.I. Artificial Intelligence”; Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later…”; Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York”; Anthony Minghella’s “Cold Mountain”; Wolfgang Petersen’s “Troy”; M. Night Shyamalan’s “The Village”; Ridley Scott’s “Kingdom of Heaven”; Neil Jordan’s “Breakfast on Pluto”; Robert Zemeckis’ “Beowulf”; Paul Greengrass’ “Green Zone”; “Perrier’s Bounty”; “Albert Nobbs”; “The Cup”; “Safe House”; “The Raven”; and as a voice in the animated “The Pirates! Band of Misfits.”
Born in Ireland, Gleeson started out as a teacher but left the profession to pursue an acting career, joining the Irish theatre company Passion Machine. His theatre
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credits include productions of “King of the Castle,” “The Plough and the Stars,” “Prayers of Sherkin,” “The Cherry Orchard,” “Juno and the Paycock” and “On Such As We.”
JONAS ARMSTRONG (Skinner) was born in Dublin, Ireland and raised in Lytham St. Annes, Lancashire, England. Armstrong did his acting training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.
After graduating, Armstrong appeared in regional theatre, and then landed roles on British television’s Channel 4 series “Teachers” and “The Ghost Squad.” His breakthrough role on television was playing Robin of Locksley in the BBC series based on “Robin Hood.” He has since appeared in “The Street,” “Agatha Christie’s Marple,” “Prisoners Wives,” “Hit & Miss,” and the TV movie “The Whale.”
His feature film credits include “Book of Blood,” which is based on a short story by Clive Barker, “Twenty8k” and “Walking with the Enemy.”
TONY WAY (Kimmel) has worked in comedy, drama, acting, writing, television, film, stage and radio for over ten years. He was discovered at the age of 17 by Bob Mortimer and Charlie Higson in an amateur comedy video, and has since worked, performed and written with some of the biggest names in comedy, including Ricky Gervais, Reeves & Mortimer, Paul Whitehouse, Sacha Baron Cohen, Martin Freeman, Steve Coogan, Lucas and Williams, Rhys Thomas and many more.
Way has recently been seen in Lone Scherfig’s “Posh”; the hit thriller “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” directed by David Fincher; the Golden Globe- and Emmy Award-winning HBO series “Game of Thrones”; and the feature film “Anonymous,” alongside Rhys Ifans. Way’s other film credits include “Convenience,” William Monahan’s “London Boulevard,” the crime comedy “Down Terrace,” the BBC short “Trimming the Fat,” David Thewlis’ “Cheeky,” Marc Forster’s “Finding Neverland,” and Sacha Baron Cohen and Dan Mazer’s “Ali G Indahouse.”
He is well known in the world of comedy, having starred in many successful television comedies, including Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant’s “Life’s Too Short” and “Extra’s”; BBC’s “Mongrels”; three seasons of “The Impressions Show”; Edgar Wright’s “Spaced”; and Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer’s “Shooting Stars,” on which he was also a writer. He also appeared in the BAFTA-winning BBC drama “Sherlock” and on the hit sci-fi drama “Dr. Who.”
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Way is a prolific writer and has written for several comedy shows, including “Dick & Dom’s Funny Business” and Alan Carr’s “Chatty Man.” He has also performed in various comedy shows at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
KICK GURRY (Griff) began his film career in Australia by starring in the Australian Film Institute’s Best Film of 2000, “Looking for Alibrandi,” opposite Anthony LaPaglia.
Gurry has subsequently worked alongside some of the most acclaimed directors and actors working in film today, with credits including Terrence Malick’s “The Thin Red Line”; the Wachowskis’ “Speed Racer” and upcoming “Jupiter Ascending”; “Buffalo Soldiers,” with Joaquin Phoenix; David Mamet’s “Spartan”; executive producer Quentin Tarantino’s “Daltry Calhoun”; and Diego Velasco’s “Cybergeddon.”
Back in Australia, Gurry shot the lead role in acclaimed director Alex Proyas’s “Garage Days,” as well as Rachel Ward’s AFI Award-winning “The Big House.” He has also most recently appeared on the small screen in the highly acclaimed and award-winning television series “Tangle” and “Offspring.”
FRANZ DRAMEH (Ford) trained at The Young Actors Theatre. His film credits include “Legacy”; “Residue”; “Now is Good”; the award-winning “Attack the Block”; Clint Eastwood’s “Hereafter”; “Right Side of God”; “Be Good”; and “There for Me.”
On television, he has been seen in “Some Girls” Series 1 and 2; the BBC’s “My Murder,” “Casualty,” “Parents of the Band” and “Living It”; “Break Kids”; “Byker Grove”; and the Discovery Channel’s “Space.”
He also appeared on stage in the Young Actors Theatre’s production of “Peter Pan.”
DRAGOMIR MRSIC (Kuntz) kicked off his movie career as a 38-year-old father of two in Josef Fares dark drama “Leo,” in 2007. His big break came three years later as the Serbian hitman, Mrado, in “Easy Money,” directed by Daniél Espinosa. The film caught international attention and Mrsic was awarded Best Actor in the Flanders International Film Festival Ghent in 2010. Martin Scorcese opened the film in Manhattan in 2012.
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Award-winning actor Mrsic is also a Nordic Champion in taekwondo and a former coach on the Swedish Olympic Committee. He owns and operates his gym, Extreme Training, where he trained both Noomi Rapace and Rooney Mara for their roles as the super-fit computer hacker Lisbeth Salander in “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.”
Mrsic released his first book, a combination of his training philosophy and biography, in 2014, and is currently busy creating and producing his first TV-series, “Alex,” due for release in 2015.
CHARLOTTE RILEY (Nance) is a busy actress on both the big and small screen. She recently played the lead in Lex Sidon’s romantic feature “Grand Street,” and will next be seen with Chris Hemsworth and Cillian Murphy in Ron Howard’s feature “Heart of the Sea,” based on Nathaniel Philbrick’s best-selling book about the dramatic true journey of the Essex.
Riley previously starred in the horror thriller “Entity,” and appeared in the romantic comedy “Easy Virtue,” with Colin Firth, Jessica Biel and Kristin Scott Thomas.
On television, she starred in the TV miniseries “World without End,” opposite a stellar cast that included Cynthia Nixon, Miranda Richardson and Peter Firth. She also appeared in “The Town,” and had a reoccurring role in ITV’s Crime Drama “DCI Banks.” In the same year, she was seen in more TV dramas, including a role in “Foyles War” and in Agatha Christie’s page-to-screen adaption of “The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side.”
In 2009, Riley tackled the universally known role of Catherine Earnshaw in an ITV adaption of the Emily Brontë novel Wuthering Heights. She starred opposite Tom Hardy as Heathcliffe. This was followed by a reccurring role on the TV series “The Take,” a crime-based drama in which she once again acted alongside Hardy.
Riley made her television debut in 2007 with a role in the BBC comedy “Grownups,” with Sheridan Smith and Steve Meo, quickly followed by an appearance in “Holby City.” Her credits also include a part in TV film “The Spanish Flu,” and another TV part in Series 2 of “Inspector George Gently,” with Martin Shaw and Lee Ingleby.
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ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS
DOUG LIMAN (Director / Executive Producer) first gained attention in 1996 with the independent film comedy “Swingers,” which became an instant cult classic. He followed with the critically acclaimed indie hit “Go,” for which he earned an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Director.
With only those two independent features under his belt, Liman flew himself to the Teton mountains, where he secured the rights to the best-selling book The Bourne Identity from author Robert Ludlum. Liman directed and produced the 2002 film version of the book, which starred Matt Damon in the title role and earned more than $214 million worldwide. He has since served as an executive producer on “The Bourne Supremacy” and “The Bourne Ultimatum.”
Liman’s film directing credits also include the action comedy “Mr. & Mrs. Smith,” starring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie; the sci-fi hit “Jumper”; and the true-life drama “Fair Game.”
For television, Liman is currently an executive producer on the series “Suits” and “Covert Affairs.”
CHRISTOPHER MCQUARRIE (Screenplay) is an Academy Award®-winning filmmaker whose credits include “The Usual Suspects,” “Valkyrie” and “Jack Reacher.” He is currently directing “Mission: Impossible V.”
JEZ & JOHN-HENRY BUTTERWORTH (Screenplay) received the Writers Guild of America’s Paul Selvin Honorary Award for their screenplay for the feature film “Fair Game,” directed by Doug Liman. Their work together will next be seen in the upcoming James Brown biopic “Get on Up.”
Jez’s additional feature credits include “Mojo” and “Birthday Girl,” both of which he also directed; “The Last Legion”; and “Huge.” He has also written for television, including the series “So Haunt Me,” “Chandler & Co,” and “The Bill,” and the TV movies “Night of the Golden Brain” and “Christmas.”
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HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA (Author) was born in Tokyo in 1970 and is a Japanese author of contemporary science fiction and fantasy. His first novel, Modern Magic Made Simple—a fantasy published in 2003—has been serialized in seven volumes and adapted into television animations and comic books.
Sakurazaka published the science fiction novel All You Need Is Kill in 2004. All You Need Is Kill has been translated and published in 12 countries, and adapted in comic books in 15 countries.
ERWIN STOFF (Producer) began his career more than twenty years ago as a founding partner in 3 Arts Entertainment, one of the leading management/production firms in Hollywood, overseeing the careers of many high-profile performers.
More recently, while continuing as a partner in 3 Arts Entertainment, Stoff has focused on producing, including, currently, the biopic “Unbroken,” a chronicle of the life of Olympic runner and World War II prisoner of war Louis Zamperini, directed by Angelina Jolie. He is also developing Margaret Stohl’s most recent book, Icons, as an upcoming feature, in conjunction with Alcon Entertainment.
Among Stoff’s long list of previously produced projects are the films “Beautiful Creatures,” based on Stohl’s novel of the same name; “Water for Elephants”; the worldwide hit remake of “The Day the Earth Stood Still”; “Street Kings”; Richard Linklater’s “A Scanner Darkly”; “Guess Who,” starring Bernie Mac and Ashton Kutcher; Francis Lawrence’s “Constantine”; “Biker Boyz,” starring Laurence Fishburne; “Sweet November,” with Charlize Theron and Keanu Reeves; and “Picture Perfect,” starring Jennifer Aniston.
Stoff’s most recent executive producer credits include the Oscar® nominated drama “The Blind Side,” starring Sandra Bullock, and the blockbuster sci-fi drama “I Am Legend,” directed by Francis Lawrence and starring Will Smith. He also served as executive producer on “47 Ronin,” “The Lake House,” “Hardball,” “The Replacements,” “The Matrix,” “The Devil’s Advocate,” and “Austin Powers: the Spy Who Shagged Me.”
For the small screen, Stoff was an executive producer on NBC’s critically acclaimed drama series “Kings,” as well as the ABC telefilm “Gotham.” In addition, 3 Arts Entertainment has produced numerous successful series, including “The Office,”
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“King of the Hill,” “Parks and Recreation,” ”30 Rock,” ”Louie,” and “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.”
TOM LASSALLY (Producer) is a manager/producer at 3 Arts Entertainment. In addition to “Edge of Tomorrow,” Lassally has produced “The To Do List,” which released in summer 2013; “Extract,” directed by Mike Judge; “Stay,” directed by Marc Forster; “First Snow,” starring Guy Pierce; and “Henry Poole is Here,” which was acquired by Overture Films at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival.
In television, Lassally produces “Silicon Valley,” which was recently renewed for its second season on HBO. He also produced Dan Mazer’s pilot “Love is Relative” for NBC and the updated “Beavis and Butthead” for MTV. He has other active projects at Fox and CBS.
On the management side, Lassally represents such clients as Keanu Reeves, Glen Gordon Caron of the upcoming “Middle Man” for FBC, Jenni Konner of “Girls,” Clark Gregg of “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” Dan Mazer of “Borat,” and Justin Kurzel of the upcoming “MacBeth,” with Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard.
Before working in management, Lassally was a longtime executive at Warner Bros., where he rose to Executive Vice President in 1995. During his eight-year tenure, Lassally shepherded over 25 motion pictures to the screen, including “Dave,” “Dennis the Menace,” “Doc Hollywood,” “Heat,” “A Time to Kill,” “Batman Forever,” “Lethal Weapon 4,” “Wild Wild West,” “Analyze This,” “The Hudsucker Proxy” and “Any Given Sunday.”
Lassally began his career working for Bob Pittman at Warner Communications Inc., shortly after graduating from NYU Film School.
JEFFREY SILVER (Producer) has produced over 30 feature films, topping $2 billion at the worldwide box office, through his production company Biscayne Pictures and his former partnership with Outlaw Productions. Most recently released was “TRON: Legacy,” starring Jeff Bridges.
“Terminator: Salvation” was released in May 2009, directed by McG and starring Christian Bale. Released in 2007 was the epic war drama and global hit “300,” adapted from the graphic novel by Frank Miller and directed by Zack Snyder. Silver also produced “Training Day,” starring Denzel Washington, “The Santa Clause” movies,
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starring Tim Allen, and the award-winning television series “The Wonder Years,” for which he received an Emmy Award as producer for Best Comedy Series.
In 1999, Silver co-founded FilmAid, dedicated to bringing projected movies to refugee camps around the world and raising awareness of the global refugee crisis. Silver also serves on the Advisory Board of the Science and Entertainment Exchange (SEE), a program of the National Academy of Sciences. SEE is focused on educating filmmakers and the public about science through movies.
GREGORY JACOBS (Producer) most recently produced the HBO Liberace biopic “Behind the Candelabra,” for which he won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries or Movie and the Golden Globe for Best TV Movie or Miniseries. The film stars Matt Damon and Michael Douglas, was directed by Steven Soderbergh, and premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.
Other films Jacobs has produced for Soderbergh include “Side Effects,” starring Rooney Mara and Jude Law; “Magic Mike,” starring Channing Tatum and Matthew McConaughey; the thriller “Haywire,” starring Mixed Martial Arts fighter Gina Carano, making her motion picture debut; the global thriller “Contagion,” with an ensemble cast led by Marion Cotillard, Matt Damon, Jude Law, Gwyneth Paltrow and Kate Winslet; “The Informant!,” starring Matt Damon; “The Girlfriend Experience,” starring Sasha Grey; “The Good German,” starring George Clooney, Cate Blanchett and Tobey Maguire; “Full Frontal,” starring Julia Roberts and Catherine Keener; “Bubble,” which, starring non-actors, premiered at the 2005 Venice Film Festival before being screened at the Toronto and New York Film Festivals; and “Equilibrium,” Soderbergh’s segment of a trio of short films released together as “Eros,” which had its premiere at the 2004 Venice Film Festival. Michaelangelo Antonioni and Wong Kar-wai directed the other two segments.
Jacobs was the executive producer on Soderbergh’s two-part Spanish-language film “Che,” starring Benicio Del Toro as Che Guevara. The films had their debut at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival, where Del Toro received the Best Actor Award. Jacobs also executive produced “Ocean’s Thirteen,” “Ocean’s Twelve” and “Solaris.” He was first assistant director on the Academy Award®-winning “Traffic”; “Erin Brockovich,” nominated for an Academy Award®; “The Limey”; “Out of Sight”; “The Underneath”; and “King Of The Hill.”
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Additionally, Jacobs directed the horror thriller “Wind Chill,” starring Emily Blunt, Ashton Holmes and Martin Donovan, which was released in 2007.
Jacobs made his writing and directorial debut on “Criminal,” starring John C. Reilly, Diego Luna and Maggie Gyllenhaal. Prior to its September 2004 release, the film was shown at the Venice, Deauville and London Film Festivals.
Upcoming for Jacobs is the new Cinemax television series “The Knick,” starring Clive Owen and directed by Steven Soderbergh, and the Amazon television pilot “Red Oaks,” which Jacobs wrote with Joseph Gangemi, to be directed by David Gordon Green.
JASON HOFFS (Producer) is a feature film and television producer based in Los Angeles, California. Hoffs currently serves as Head of Production for VIZ Productions, a subsidiary of Shueisha/Shogakukan publishers in Japan. VIZ Productions acquires world class Japanese intellectual properties in the form of manga, anime, novels and film remakes, and packages them with Hollywood creative talent, including actors, directors and screenwriters.
VIZ Productions currently has several films in development, including an adaptation of the science fiction novel Yukikaze, by Kambayashi Chohei, and an adaptation of the world-famous graphic novel Death Note.
Prior to joining VIZ Productions, Hoffs had a long association with the director Steven Spielberg. Hoffs served as executive producer on Spielberg’s “The Terminal,” starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Zeta-Jones. As a production executive at Spielberg’s studio, Dreamworks, Hoffs was responsible for overseeing such hit films as “Meet the Parents,” “Small Soldiers,” “The Peacemaker,” “Mousehunt,” “The Flintstones” and “Casper.”
DAVID BARTIS (Executive Producer) has, since 2001, been a partner in Hypnotic, a film and television production company he founded with the critically acclaimed director Doug Liman. He produced the feature film “Fair Game,” directed by Liman, that starred Naomi Watts and Sean Penn and premiered in competition at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.
On television, Bartis and Liman were executive producers on the hit Fox series “The OC.” In the 2005 to 2006 season, the duo produced the pilot and series “Heist,”
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for NBC. In 2008, Bartis produced the television movie remake of “Knight Rider” for NBC, as well as the subsequent series it spawned that aired the following season. More recently, Bartis executive produced the first season of “I Just Want My Pants Back,” for MTV. Additionally, he serves as executive producer on two of USA Network’s hit original series: the international spy drama “Covert Affairs,” starring Piper Perabo, and the hit drama series “Suits,” starring Gabriel Macht and Patrick J. Adams.
Prior to forming Hypnotic, Bartis was senior vice president, primetime series, NBC Studios. During his tenure there he supervised the development and production of all primetime comedy and drama series for NBC Studios, including “Providence” and “Will & Grace,” both of which achieved breakout hit status during their freshman seasons. Prior to that, he served as HBO’s vice president, original programming, West Coast, and vice president, creative affairs, HBO Independent Productions (HIP).
Bartis was HIP’s development executive and also supervised production of the long-running Fox comedy “Martin,” and was the development and current production executive on the critically acclaimed and Emmy Award-winning CBS comedy “Everybody Loves Raymond.”
Prior to joining HBO, Bartis was director of programming at Quincy Jones Entertainment, where he was involved in the development and launch of NBC’s “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.”
His producing credits on feature films include “Mail Order Wife” and the thriller “Cry Wolf.” Bartis began his career in 1985 as an intern at Fox Lorber Associates in New York.
A native of Providence, Rhode Island, Bartis earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University.
JOBY HAROLD (Executive Producer) wrote and directed the feature film “Awake,” starring Jessica Alba, Hayden Christensen, Terrence Howard and Lena Olin.
He has numerous projects in development, including the script for the upcoming “King Arthur,” directed by Guy Ritchie and currently scheduled for release in July of 2016.
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HIDEMI FUKUHARA (Executive Producer) is a film producer who from 2004 to 2012 was running a San Francisco-based publishing company—VIZ Media, publisher of All You Need is Kill— and has been actively introducing Japanese movie-friendly content, including comics, animations and novels to Hollywood.
Born in Japan in 1950, Fukuhara graduated from Hitotsubashi University in 1974 and spent his career in the financial industry before joining Hollywood. Fukuhara served as a deputy president of Merrill Lynch Japan from 2000 to 2003.
Fukuhara is named as a fellow of Ace Productions, a Japanese movie producing company, as well as One Associates, a Japanese business consulting company.
BRUCE BERMAN (Executive Producer) is Chairman and CEO of Village Roadshow Pictures. The company has a successful joint partnership with Warner Bros. Pictures to co-produce a wide range of motion pictures, with all films distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. and in select territories by Village Roadshow Pictures.
The initial slate of films produced under the pact included such hits as “Practical Magic,” starring Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman; “Analyze This,” teaming Robert De Niro and Billy Crystal; “The Matrix,” starring Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne; “Three Kings,” starring George Clooney; “Space Cowboys,” directed by and starring Clint Eastwood; and “Miss Congeniality,” starring Bullock and Benjamin Bratt.
Under the Village Roadshow Pictures banner, Berman has subsequently executive produced such wide-ranging successes as “Training Day,” for which Denzel Washington won an Oscar®; the “Ocean’s” trilogy; “Two Weeks’ Notice,” pairing Bullock and Hugh Grant; Eastwood’s “Mystic River,” starring Sean Penn and Tim Robbins in Oscar®-winning performances; “The Matrix Reloaded” and “The Matrix Revolutions”; Tim Burton’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” starring Johnny Depp; the blockbuster “I Am Legend,” starring Will Smith; the acclaimed drama “Gran Torino,” directed by and starring Clint Eastwood; director Guy Ritchie’s hit action adventure “Sherlock Holmes,” starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law, and its sequel, “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.” Most recently, Berman served as executive producer on Baz Luhrmann’s “The Great Gatsby,” nominated for Best Picture by the Australian Film Institute, and the animated adventure “The LEGO Movie,” directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller and featuring an all-star vocal cast.
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His upcoming projects include the Wachowski’s sci-fi adventure “Jupiter Ascending”; “The Judge,” a drama starring Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall; Ron Howard’s action adventure “Heart of the Sea,” based on the Nathaniel Philbrick bestseller about the dramatic true journey of the whaling ship Essex; and George Miller’s “Mad Max: Fury Road.”
Berman got his start in the motion picture business working with Jack Valenti at the MPAA while attending Georgetown Law School in Washington, DC. After earning his law degree, he landed a job at Casablanca Films in 1978. Moving to Universal, he worked his way up to a production Vice President in 1982.
In 1984, Berman joined Warner Bros. as a production Vice President, and was promoted to Senior Vice President of Production four years later. He was appointed President of Theatrical Production in September 1989, and in 1991 was named to the post of President of Worldwide Theatrical Production, which he held through May 1996. Under his aegis, Warner Bros. Pictures produced and distributed such films as “Presumed Innocent,” “GoodFellas,” “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves,” the Oscar®-winning Best Picture “Driving Miss Daisy,” “Batman Forever,” “Under Siege,” “Malcolm X,” “The Bodyguard,” “JFK,” “The Fugitive,” “Dave,” “Disclosure,” “The Pelican Brief,” “Outbreak,” “The Client,” “A Time to Kill,” and “Twister.”
In May of 1996, Berman started Plan B Entertainment, an independent motion picture company at Warner Bros. Pictures. He was named Chairman and CEO of Village Roadshow Pictures in February 1998.
DION BEEBE (Director of Photography) won the 2005 Academy Award®, as well as BAFTA, Australian Film Institute (AFI) and American Society of Cinematographer (ASC) Awards, for his work on Rob Marshall’s drama “Memoirs of a Geisha.” The film marked Beebe’s second collaboration with filmmaker Marshall, following their work on the director’s Best Picture Oscar® winner, “Chicago,” for which Beebe scored his first Oscar® and BAFTA Award nominations. He collaborated with Marshall again on the lavish film musical “Nine,” earning another ASC Award nomination, and on the upcoming “Into the Woods,” based on the successful stage musical.
Born in Brisbane, Australia, Beebe moved with his family at age five to Cape Town, South Africa. He first studied at Pretoria Technical College for a year before moving back to Australia to enroll in the Australian Film, Television and Radio School—
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the only full-time cinematography student at the time—where he won an AFI Award and an Australian Cinematographers Society (ACS) Golden Tripod honor for two of his student films.
After graduation, Beebe honed his craft shooting short films, TV commercials and directing and shooting music videos. His first feature credit as a cinematographer came on the 1992 drama “Crush.” He compiled another half-dozen documentary and feature credits over the next five years, winning a Golden Tripod Award from the ACS for “Down Rusty Down” in 1997. He won two more ACS honors, for John Curran’s drama “Praise” in 1998, for which he also garnered award nominations from the AFI and Film Critics Circle of Australia (FCCA), and Jane Campion’s 2003 mystery “In the Cut.” In addition, he earned AFI and FCCA Award nominations for the 1996 Aussie feature “What I Have Written” and another FCCA Award nomination for “The Goddess of 1967.”
Beebe’s first U.S. film credit was on Mira Nair’s Showtime drama “My Own Country.” Beebe went on to collaborate twice with director Michael Mann, first on “Collateral,” for which he shared BAFTA and ASC Award nominations with Paul Cameron, and then on “Miami Vice.” His other credits encompass both features and documentaries and include Unjoo Moon’s Tony Bennett documentary “The Zen of Bennett”; Ruben Fleischer’s “Gangster Squad”; Martin Campbell’s “Green Lantern”; Brad Silberling’s “Land of the Lost”; Gavin Hood’s “Rendition”; the musical documentary “I’m Only Looking: The Best of INXS”; “Equilibrium”; Gillian Armstrong’s “Charlotte Gray”; “Forever Lulu”; and “Holy Smoke,” which marked his first collaboration with Campion. In addition, he lensed Rob Marshall’s 2006 TV concert tribute “Tony Bennett: An American Classic.”
OLIVER SCHOLL (Production Designer) is a film production designer most noted for “Independence Day,” “Godzilla” and “The Time Machine.” Production design for Doug Liman’s “Jumper” led to Scholl designing “Edge of Tomorrow.”
Scholl was born in Germany and studied industrial design at Pforzheim University. An avid reader of science fiction novels and aerospace books, his interest in the intersection of art and technology began in his teens and continues to inform his work today. At the age of 15, Scholl’s first of many illustrations was published in the German science fiction series Perry Rhodan.
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Conceptual design work for film director Roland Emmerich led to Scholl’s transition into the motion picture industry and his relocation to Los Angeles in 1991. He began working as a conceptual designer or illustrator on such feature films as “Stargate,” “Batman Forever,” “Mission to Mars” and “A.I. Artificial Intelligence.”
In addition to development work on films, TV series, theme parks, video games, music videos and commercials, Scholl continues to create artwork for science fiction publications. His favorite aspect of production design is exploring the visual opportunities environments can offer to make a story come alive.
JAMES HERBERT (Editor) has worked with director Guy Ritchie on a variety of projects, most recently including the global blockbusters “Sherlock Holmes” and “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows,” and the upcoming “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” Their previous collaborations include the features “RocknRolla” and “Revolver,” the documentary “The Ego Has Landed” and the ABC television pilot “Suspects.”
His additional film credits include “Gangster Squad”; the independent features “The Sweeney,” for director Nick Love, “Echelon Conspiracy” and “Lesbian Vampire Killers”; the remake of the 1974 cult classic horror film “It’s Alive”; the thriller “Devil’s Harvest”; the comedy “Dirty Sanchez: The Movie”; and Paul Verhoeven’s internationally acclaimed World War II drama “Black Book.”
As an assistant editor, Herbert’s credits include “Sahara,” starring Matthew McConaughey and Penelope Cruz; Wolfgang Petersen’s “Troy,” starring Brad Pitt; “Peter Pan,” directed by P.J. Hogan; Jan de Bont’s “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life,” starring Angelina Jolie; the James Bond film “Die Another Day”; and Tony Scott’s “Spy Game,” starring Robert Redford and Brad Pitt.
KATE HAWLEY (Costume Designer) most recently completed work on the sci-fi action adventure “Pacific Rim,” directed by Guillermo del Toro, and the director’s upcoming horror film “Crimson Peak,” due out next year. Hawley previously designed the costumes for the independent film “On a Clear Day,” which debuted at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival, and she served as an additional costume designer for the Peter Jackson-directed “The Hobbit” Trilogy and “The Lovely Bones.”
She has designed extensively for the stage, including both theatre and opera productions. Her credits include “The Trial of the Cannibal Dog,” for the New Zealand
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International Arts Festival; “Luca Di Lammermoor,” at the NBR New Zealand Opera; “The Love of the Nightingale,” for the Western Australian Opera; “The Blonde, the Brunette and the Vengeful Redhead,” for the Auckland Theatre Company; “Alice in Wonderland,” at Venice, Italy’s The Danielli; “Blithe Spirit,” at the Salisbury Playhouse; and “La Bohème,” at the Wexford Opera Festival. Additionally, Hawley served as costume and production designer for “La Tete,” presented at the Royal National Theatre Studio and as production designer for “Albert Herring,” at the Aldeburgh Festival. Additionally, her designs have been featured in exhibitions in London and Prague.
Her awards include the Gold Key Award from the Bretislav Film Festival for the Channel 4/BBC production of “T DANCE”; the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council Award for Opera Studies; the Prague Quadrennial 99 Award for Emerging Young Artists; and the Television New Zealand Young Achievers Award.
Hawley earned a degree at the Wellington School of Design in New Zealand. She later attended London’s Motley School of Theatre Design and trained in stage drafting at the Royal Opera House in London.
NICK DAVIS (Visual Effects Supervisor) earned Oscar® and BAFTA Award nominations for his work on the acclaimed blockbuster “The Dark Knight,” for director Christopher Nolan. Davis also received BAFTA Award nominations for his visual effects achievements in Tim Burton’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” and the first two Harry Potter films, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” and “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.”
More recently, Davis was the visual effects supervisor on “Clash of the Titans,” as well as its sequel, “Wrath of the Titans,” on which he also served as second unit director. His credits as a VFX supervisor also include Wolfgang Petersen’s epic “Troy,” Jon Amiel’s “Entrapment,” Jeremiah Chechnik’s “The Avengers,” and Andrew Davis’ “Chain Reaction.” He also served as post-production visual effects supervisor on Joel Schumacher’s “Batman & Robin” and “Batman Forever.”
Davis has also worked on the visual effects teams of a number of other films, including as a visual effects producer on Wes Craven’s “A New Nightmare” and the Andrew Davis-directed films “The Fugitive” and “Under Siege,” and technical supervisor on Peter Weir’s “Fearless.”
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Davis graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English and Politics from Oxford Brookes University. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and BAFTA and has served on the BAFTA Visual Effects Nomination Committee.
CHRISTOPHE BECK (Composer) is behind the score to the Golden Globe- and Oscar®-winning film “Frozen.” The “Frozen” soundtrack, certified platinum 11 weeks after its release, has sold more than one million copies, and spent five non-consecutive weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 album chart. Beck returned to the Muppets in “Muppets Most Wanted” after scoring “The Muppets” in 2011. He’s also scored the blockbuster “Hangover” trilogy, “Tower Heist,” “Due Date,” “Date Night” and “Pitch Perfect.” He staged the drama for such films as “We Are Marshall,” “Percy Jackson & The Olympians: The Lightning Thief,” “Elektra,” “The Sentinel,” “Under the Tuscan Sun,” and indie films “Year of the Dog,” “Phoebe in Wonderland,” “Saved!” and the award-winning documentary “Waiting for Superman.”
In addition to “Frozen”—which earned Beck an Annie Award for best score—his recent work includes “The Internship,” directed by Shawn Levy and starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, and “Runner Runner,” directed by Brad Furman and starring Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake. Beck also composed the music for Shana Feste’s romantic drama “Endless Love.”
The Canadian composer began playing piano at the age of five, studied music at Yale and attended the USC film scoring program under the tutelage of composers like Jerry Goldsmith. He started composing in television at the personal recommendation of Disney music legend Buddy Baker, and was soon writing music for the hit series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” earning an Emmy Award.

WARNER BROS. PICTURES Presents

In Association with

VILLAGE ROADSHOW PICTURES

In Association with

RATPAC-DUNE ENTERTAINMENT

 

A 3 ARTS Production

In Association with

VIZ PRODUCTIONS, LLC

A DOUG LIMAN Film

 

 

CAST

 

Cage TOM CRUISE

Rita EMILY BLUNT

General Brigham BRENDAN GLEESON

Master Sergeant Farell BILL PAXTON

Skinner JONAS ARMSTRONG

Kimmel TONY WAY

Griff KICK GURRY

Ford FRANZ DRAMEH

Kuntz DRAGOMIR MRSIC

Nance CHARLOTTE RILEY

Takeda MASAYOSHI HANEDA

Cruel Sergeant TERENCE MAYNARD

Dr. Carter NOAH TAYLOR

Karen Lord LARA PULVER

Julie MADELEINE MANTOCK

Infirmary Nurse ASSLY ZANDRY

Young Soldier/ Tarmac SEBASTIAN BLUNT

Secretary – Judith BETH GODDARD

Dog Soldier 1 RONAN SUMMERS

Dog Soldier 2 AARON ROMANO

Dog Soldier 3 USMAN AKRAM

Dog Soldier 4 BENTLEY KALU

Bar Maid MAIREAD MCKINLEY

Old Man ANDREW NEIL

Drunk MARTIN HYDER

Drop Ship Pilot TOMMY CAMPBELL

Old Man 2 JOHN DUTTON

Old Man 3 HARRY LANDIS

Military Spokesperson 1 RACHEL HANDSHAW

Military Spokesperson 2 MARTIN MCDOUGALL

Sky News Anchor (herself) ANNA BOTTING

BBC News Anchor (herself) JANE HILL

CNN News Anchor (herself) ERIN BURNETT

Channel 2 News Anchor (himself) DANY CUSHMARO

Voice of UDF Commercial DAVID KAYE

Refugee Dog JACKSON

 

Stunt Coordinator WADE EASTWOOD

 

Stunt Performers

CHRISTOPHER GORDON SCOTT ARMSTRONG GEORGE BAILEY

OLIVER BAILEY RICK ENGLISH OLIVER GOUGH

PAUL HARFORD MICHAEL LI ANDY LISTER

SARAH LOCHLAN KEVIN LYONS ADRIAN MCGAW

NICK MCKINLESS SAM PARHAM WOLFGANG STEGEMANN

MENS-SANA TAMAKLOE DAVE VAN ZEYL MARLOW WARRINGTON-MATTEI

ANNABEL ELIZABETH WOOD LIANG YANG COLE ARMITAGE

LEE BAGLEY RANDY BECKMAN JAMES COX

JASON CURLE MATT DA SILVA NICHOLAS DAINES

DANIEL DOW BRADLEY FARMER ANNALESE FERRARI

CAMINO GARCIA PAUL HAMPSHIRE DANIEL HIRST

JORGE HUERGO JASON HUNJAN BORIS MARTINEZ

DOMONKOS PARDANYI CHRISTIAN PETERSSON ANDY PILGRIM

CURTIS SMALL MARVIN STEWART-CAMPBELL SHANE STEYN

CARLY STUCKY PABLO VERDEJO VINCENT WANG

ANDY WAREHAM MAXINE WHITTAKER SIMON WHYMAN

 

FILMMAKERS

Directed by DOUG LIMAN

Screenplay by CHRISTOPHER MCQUARRIE and JEZ BUTTERWORTH

& JOHN-HENRY BUTTERWORTH

Produced by ERWIN STOFF

TOM LASSALLY

JEFFREY SILVER

GREGORY JACOBS

JASON HOFFS

Executive Producers DOUG LIMAN

DAVID BARTIS

STEVEN MNUCHIN

JOBY HAROLD

HIDEMI FUKUHARA

and BRUCE BERMAN

Co-Producers TIM LEWIS

KIM WINTHER

 

Based on the novel entitled‘All You Need Is Kill’ by HIROSHI SAKURAZAKA

 

Director of Photography DION BEEBE, ACS, ASC

Production Designer OLIVER SCHOLL

Edited by JAMES HERBERT

LAURA JENNINGS

Casting by LUCINDA SYSON, C.D.G./C.S.A.

Costume Designer KATE HAWLEY

Visual Effects Supervisor NICK DAVIS

Music by CHRISTOPHE BECK

Music Supervisor JULIANNE JORDAN

Unit Production Managers TIM LEWIS

JEFFREY SILVER

First Assistant Director KIM WINTHER

First Assistant Directors MAX KEENE

CHRIS CARRERAS

Key Second Assistant Director WILL DODDS

Second Unit Director and Stunt Coordinator SIMON CRANE

Second Unit Director of Photography FRASER TAGGART

Supervising Art Director NEIL LAMONT

Art Directors ALASTAIR BULLOCK

GARY TOMKINS

MARK HARRIS

CHRISTIAN HUBAND

JASON KNOX-JOHNSTON

HALEY EASTON-STREET

STEPHEN SWAIN

ANDREW PALMER

Assistant Art Directors JO FINKEL

ROBERT HOCHSTOEGER

ASHLEY LAMONT

WILL COUBROUGH

JEFFREY SIMON

Art Department Coordinator POLLY SEATH

 

Draughtspersons

OLIVER ROBERTS

ANDREA BORLAND

GAVIN DEAN

LYDIA FRY

ANDY PROCTOR

MATT SIMS

EDWARD SYMON

 

CHARLES SZCZECH

Concept Artists

HARALD BELKER

TIM BROWNING

STEVE BURG

STEPHEN FORREST-SMITH

JAMES HEGEDUS

WILL HTAY

JEFF JULIAN

TANI KUNITAKE

MAGDA KUSOWSKA

MICHELLE MOEN

ED NATIVIDAD

JAIME RAMA

MATTHEW SAVAGE

 

HENRIK TAMM

Illustrators DAVID ALLCOCK

MARTIN ASBURY

Graphic Artists TINA CHARAD

ANDREW TAPPER

AMY GREWCOCK

Creature Concept Sculptor IVAN MANZELLA

Art Department Researcher ANGELA STAUFFER

Stock Footage Researcher JODI TRIPI

A Camera Operator/ Steadicam PETER ROBERTSON, ACO

B Camera Operator JULIAN MORSON, ACO

C Camera Operator DAMIEN BEEBE

A Camera First Assistant SIMON HUME

B Camera First Assistant OLLY TELLETT

C Camera First Assistant DAVID COZENS

A Camera Second Assistant ALAN HALL

B Camera Second Assistant PAUL SNELL

C Camera Second Assistant SACHA JONES

Central Loader HARRY GAMBLE

Video Playback Operator BOB BRIDGES

Video Assist Operator STUART BRIDGES

Production Sound Mixer STUART WILSON, AMPS

Boom Operator ORIN BEATON

Sound Utility THOMAS FENNELL

Script Supervisor LISA VICK

Post Production Executive MARIANNE JENKINS

Post Production Supervisor TIM GROVER

First Assistant Editors PHIL HEDGECOCK

MARK BURTON

Second Assistant Editors ANGUS MUNRO

HENRY KEMPLEN

Visual Effects Photography BOB EBERLEIN

Visual Effects Assistant Editor ED HALL

Apprentice Editor KELLY CHANG

Visual Effects Producers ALEX BICKNELL

EMMA NORTON

Visual Effects Production Supervisor GAVIN ROUND

Visual Effects Coordinator KINGSLEY COOK

Visual Effects Assistant Coordinators ALEX BELGEONNE

JACK DANIELS

Visual Effects Data Coordinator SIMON BENNETT-LEYH

Visual Effects Data Wranglers DOMINIC RIDLEY

ROSS CLARK

MIKE WOODHEAD

ADRIAN RATLEY

RICHARD EDWARDS-EARL

Visual Effects Assistant Data Wrangler SOPHIE ANDERSON

 

Compositors

NEIL CULLEY SIMON LEECH MATTHEW TINSLEY

MOTI BRYAN SANDRA CHOCHOLSKA JACK HUGHES

DOM THOMPSON

 

Supervising Sound Editor DOMINIC GIBBS

Re-Recording Mixers CHRIS BURDON

MARK TAYLOR

Sound Designer JIMMY BOYLE

Dialogue Editor DAN MORGAN

ADR Editors SIMON CHASE

BJØRN OLE SCHROEDER

Sound Effects Editors MICHAEL FENTUM

BEN MEECHAN

First Assistant Sound Editor ALISTAIR HAWKINS

Assistant Sound Editor DAWN GOUGH

Second Assistant Sound Editor LUKE GENTRY

Additional Audio MARK P STOECKINGER

ANN SCIBELLI

Costume Supervisor DAN GRACE

Assistant Costume Designer JOE HOBBS

Assistant Costume Supervisor BRENDAN HANDSCOMBE

Costume Coordinator KATE CHADDERTON

Concept Artist JACK DUDMAN

Key Textile Artist LIBBY DEMPSTER

Costumer to Mr. Cruise NANCY THOMPSON

Key Costumer NICK ROCHE GORDON

 

Costumers

JILL AVERY DAN BLACKLOCK ADRIAN SIMMONS

JUSTINE WARHURST JENNIFER ALFORD ANNETTE ALLEN

SACHA CHANDISINGH ROSIE COPPOLA AMANDA COX

PERRY GOYEN NICOLA FOY EMMA HARDING

JAMIE HARVEY STEVE KILL ROSIE MACCURRACH

KATHRYN MYSKO VON SCHULTZE CAROLINE NICHOLLS LISA ROBINSON

MARK SUTHERLAND

 

Makeup & Hair Designer SARAH MONZANI

Key Makeup Artist AILBHE LEMASS

Crowd Makeup & Hair Supervisor CHRISTINE WHITNEY

Makeup & Hair Artists

JESS BROOKS ZOE BROWN LISA PICKERING

JACKIE BHAVNANI KIRSTY MCQUEEN

 

Hairdresser to Mr. Cruise MICHAEL WHITE

Hair Artist FRANCESCO ALBERICO

Set Decorator ELLI GRIFF

Production Buyer GRAHAM BISHOP

Assistant Set Decorators NETTY CHAPMAN

HELEN PLAYER

Drapes Master GRAHAM CAULFIELD

Production Manager KATHERINE TIBBETTS

Production Coordinator MIRANDA MARKS

Assistant Production Coordinators DAN TURNER

ANETA CHALAS

Post Production Coordinator JANE WINKLES

Stunt Department Coordinator SUSANA TORRES

Executive Assistant to Mr. Liman GRACE BRETON

Assistants to Mr. Liman DANIEL LYONS

ALISON WINTER

Assistants to Mr. Stoff ANGELA TAYLOR

ROBYN JOHNSON

Assistant to Mr. Silver MATT BRADLEY

Assistants to Mr. Jacobs ELAINE MONGEON

HANNAH BOSCHI

Assistant to Mr. Lassally BEN COHEN

Assistant to Mr. Cruise CASS CAPAZORIO

Assistant to Ms. Blunt JADE GORDON

Environmental Steward BRIDGET PETTY

Production Secretary CLAIRE WALKER

Casting Assistant KATE RINGSELL

Physical Trainer MARTIN TURK

Second Assistant Directors JOEY COUGHLIN

FRASER FENNELL-BALL

Third Assistant Directors SARAH BRAND

HOLLY GARDNER

CLARE GLASS

TAMARA KING

BARNABY RIGGS

Supervising Location Manager SUE QUINN

Location Managers STEVE HARVEY

DAN WHITTY

Studio Unit Managers JOSEPH JAYAWARDENA

ANDREW PAYNE

Assistant Location Managers LUCAS SAUNAL

GEORGETTE TURNER

Financial Controller DOROTHY PRECIOUS

Production Accountant BETTY WILLIAMS

Visual Effects Post Production Accountant NICKY COATS

 

Assistant Accountants

SARAH STIFF CHRIS NORMAN ANDREW PYKE

WILL O’TOOLE HELEN GLOVER ANN ORMESHER JOHNSON

HARRIET EASTGATE ARTUR SURMA

 

Chief Lighting Technician CHUCK FINCH

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician BILLY MERRELL

Rigging Gaffer TOMMY FINCH

Rigging Best Boy JAMIE HUNT

 

Lighting Technicians

RICHARD MERRELL PERRY CULLEN STEVE WOOD

BILLY DUNN STEVE POWTON ELLIOT THOMAS

 

Key Grip GARY HUTCHINGS

Best Boy Grip NICK RAY

 

Dolly Grips STEVE PUGH

SIMON MUIR

LUKE CHISHOLM

Crane Technician PAUL LEGALL

Special Effects Supervisor DOMINIC TUOHY

Special Effects Floor Supervisor DARRELL GUYON

Special Effects Workshop Supervisor JEREMY LOVETT

Special Effects Coordinator JESS LEWINGTON

 

Special Effects Senior Technicians

IAN BIGGS DAVID FORD VINCENT ABBOTT

ANDY AITKEN ADAM ALDRIDGE PHILIP ASHTON

PAUL BENTMAN PAUL CLANCY DAVID ELTHAM

RICKY FARNS NICK FINLAYSON GARTH GUTTERIDGE

MARK HADDENHAM KEVN HERD DAN HOMEWOOD

MATT JOHNSON DAVID KEEN STEVEN LEWIS

IAN LOWE LUKE MURPHY PATRICK O’SULLIVAN

LEE PHELAN JOHN PILGRIM ANTHONY PRICKETT

JIM SHEPPARD PAUL TAYLOR JAMIE WEGUELIN

 

Property Master GRAEME PURDY

Assistant Property Master NICK MILNER

Props Storeman CHARLES JELLIS

 

Propmen

DAVE MIDSON PAUL PURDY ROD FORBES

MICKEY PUGH BOB SHERWOOD STUART WALPOLE

JONATHAN DOWNING ELIZABETH ABAD QUINTERO

 

Dressing Propmen

MARK FRUIN TERRY ROYCE ANDY SKIPSEY

JOE DIPPLE SHANE HARFORD GEORGE PUGH

DANIEL PURDY-ARAGON

 

HOD Props Modelmaker CRAIG NARRAMORE

Props Modelmakers BEN CROOKS

SANDER ELLERS

HOD Prop Carpenter LEE BIGGS

HOD Prop Painter JOHN ROBERTS

Head ExoSuit Builder PIERRE BOHANNA

Senior Supervising Modeller JOHN WELLER

 

Supervising Modellers

JAMES BARR CHRISTOPHER ELDRIDGE ADRIAN GETLEY

TOBY HAWKES

 

Senior Modellers

CRISSY HOWES

JONATHAN JACKSON

PAUL KNIGHT

DAVID MERRYWEATHER

DAY MURCH

TERRY WHITEHOUSE

 

STEPHEN WOTHERSPOON

 

 

Modellers

STUART MERIDEW

JOHN LAMBERT

SARAH CLAMP

RYAN COX

NEIL ELLIS

PHILIP GAY

TAMZINE HANKS

ROY HALFPENNY

CHRIS HAYES

VICTORIA HAYES

DARREN HOWTON

ROBIN JACKSON

TIFFANY KEARSLEY

SEAN KENRICK

ANGELA KYRIACOU

KATE LODGE

DAVID LONDON

GUY MAINWARING

PAUL MARSH

DEAN MASON

EMMA PICKARD

JEREMY PLUMRIDGE

NICK RICHARDSON

TOM SINDEN

MIKE SMART

WILL SUMPTER

RICHARD THOMAS

JOE VETTESE

BEN WELLER

CLINT WHELAN

SAM WILLIAMS

 

DANIEL WRIGHT

 

Sculptor ANDREW HODGSON

Supervising Armourer SIMON ATHERTON

Armourers ROY STRATFORD

TIM WILDGOOSE

Armoury DOMINIC WEISZ

Military Advisors BILLY BUDD

PATRICK CULLEN

Unit Publicist CLAIRE RASKIND

Stills Photographer DAVID JAMES

Construction Manager PAUL HAYES

Assistant Construction Manager DAVID WESCOTT

Construction Coordinator AMANDA PETTETT

HOD Carpenter JOHN KIRSOP

Supervising Carpenters WILLIAM STICKLEY

LAURENCE BURNS

JAMIE GAMBLEN

HOD Plasterer PAUL TAGGART

Supervising Plasterers MARTIN MORAN

STEVE BROWN

GARY WALKER

HOD Scenic Painter PAUL WESCOTT

Supervising Scenic Painter PAUL WHITELOCK

HOD Stagehand STEVE BOVINGDON

Supervising Stagehands PAUL DAVIES

CHRIS HEDGES

HOD Rigger SIMON ALDERTON

Supervising Riggers SEAN YOUNG

RUSSELL PROSSER

Standby Carpenter ANTHONY CHALLENOR

Standby Rigger ANDY CHALLIS

Standby Plasterer ANDREW WESCOTT

Standby Scenic Painter NICK WILLIAMS

Standby Stagehand NIGEL ROSS

Action Vehicle Coordinator DARREN LITTEN

Action Vehicle Senior Technicians STEVE SPINK

SIMON THOMAS

Transport Coordinator DEAN MORAN

Unit Nurse DIANA PERKO

Medical PAUL DRINAN

PETER DUGMORE

Health & Safety Advisors LARRY EYDMANN

JAKE EDMONDS

Security MARIO A. ROMAIN

Extras Casting THE CASTING COLLECTIVE

Caterer LINDLEY GROUP

Craft Supervisors MIKE & GILLY JOHNSON

 

Art Department Assistants

MATT ANDREWS

CHRISTIAN ASHTON

HELEN DAWSON

TIM DUTTON

ADAM FAUX

SAMUEL LEAKE

HUGH MCCLELLAND

SOPHIE NEIL

ELICIA SCALES

 

 

 

 

Set Production Assistants

GEORGE BATCHELOR MARKUS FRY SAMSON HAVELAND

TEDZ LEONARD TAMARA MITCHELL LAURA MOLONEY

SAM ROOK LORENA WRIGHT

 

Production Assistants

KIRBY ALLEN SOPHIE ALLEN MARIANNE BENDTSEN

EMILY BICK MARIA D’AGOSTINO GRAHAM DOCHERTY

JAKE EDWARDS JOANNE FOX KATE GWYNNE

ADAM HARRIS JOHN JACOVOU JESS JOLLEY

SAMANTHA KELM DOMINIC MEYRICK-BROOK OLIVER MITCHELL

RICHARD O’SULLIVAN ANN PILLBEAM WILLIAM PRICHARD

ROBERT SEALEY KATHERINE SHEEHY ANNA WILSON

CAROLINE WILSON

 

SECOND UNIT

Production Manager TERRY BAMBER

First Assistant Director TERRY MADDEN

Production Accountant CAROL ROTHEL

Production Coordinator ARABELLA GILBERT

Second Assistant Director TERENCE P. MADDEN

Third Assistant Directors GLEN CARROLL

ROBERT MADDEN

NICK LAURENCE

THOMAS EDMONDSON

Art Director MATT KERLY

A Camera Operator PETER FIELD, ACO

B Camera Operator OLIVER LONCRAINE, ACO

C Camera Operator STEFAN STANKOWSKI, ACO

A Camera First Assistant STEVE BURGESS

B Camera First Assistant ROB PALMER

C Camera First Assistant LEIGH GOLD

A Camera Second Assistant ANDREW JONES

B Camera Second Assistant ALEX BENDER

C Camera Second Assistant JAMES PERRY

Central Loader FRANCESCO FERRARI

Video Playback Operator DANIEL HARTLEY

Video Assist Operator RICHARD SHEAN

Production Sound Mixer TIM WHITE

Cable Person NICHOLAS GILLETT

Script Supervisor CARMEN TABANYI

Key Costumer CHRISTOF ROCHE GORDON

Costumer MEL LEIGHTON

Chief Lighting Technician MARTIN SMITH

Additional Chief Lighting Technician GARY OWEN

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician LEE ELDRED

 

Lighting Technicians

JAMIE FLETCHER RON GREEN CHRISTOPHER POLDEN

MARK RAFFERTY MITCH WHISKER JIM WORLEY

 

Key Grip KEVIN FRASER

Dolly Grips ANTHONY BENJAMIN

DAVID RIST

PETE OLNEY

VIC HAMMOND

Libra Technician DAVE FREETH

Standby Carpenter RYAN SINNOTT

Standby Riggers CHRISTIAN DURANT

ROBERT WELLER

Standby Painter RHYS COURT

Standby Stagehand MARTIN BROWN

Special Effects Floor Supervisor STEPHEN HUTCHINSON

 

Special Effects Technicians

JAMIE CORBOULD STUART PRIOR PHOEBE TAIT

KEVIN WESCOTT

Chargehand Dressing Propman JUSTIN HAYZELDEN

Standby Propmen JOE BOVINGTON

BRADLEY TORBETT

Unit Nurse LINDA ROBERTS

Catering Supervisor MIKE O’FARRELL

 

Set Production Assistants

LUC GAVIGAN REBECCA DARK DAVID ORPHEUS

SUSANNAH MADDEN MARK BOULDING JACK IVINS

EMILY RHODES

 

Production Assistants

TERRY ARCHER HEPHZIBAH CRAEN CRISTINA MANLISES

CHLOE WARREN

 

Stereo Supervisor CHRIS PARKS

Stereographer ANGUS CAMERON

Stereo 3D Production Supervisor ANNA PANTON

Stereo 3D Data Manager JAMES LONG

Stereo 3D Coordinator ANITA M. PATEL

Stereo 3D Editor MARTIN CORBETT

Stereo 3D Conform Editor DAVID JOHNSTON

Assistant Stereo 3D Editor GEORGE ADAMS

Stereo 3D Technical Manager SIMON HARGREAVES

Vision 3 Producer ADAM MAY

ADR Mixers ANDY STALLABRASS

THOMAS J. O’CONNELL

Foley Editor KEVIN PENNEY

Foley Mixer GLEN GATHARD

Foley Artists JASON SWANSCOTT

PETER BURGIS

Supervising Music Editor FERNAND BOS

Music Editors ALLAN JENKINS

MIKE HIGHAM

BRENT BROOKS

Score Produced by LEO BIRENBERG

Score Recorded and Mixed by CASEY STONE

Orchestrations by JOHN ASHTON THOMAS

Orchestra Conducted by TIM DAVIES

Score Coordinator ZACH ROBINSON

Synth Programmers MICHAEL WHITE

MALCOLM PARDON

FREDRIK RINMAN

Pro Tools Operator: ADAM MILLER

Music Coordinator JORDAN HALE

Music Clearances KAREN ELLIOTT

Digital Intermediate by TECHNICOLOR CREATIVE SERVICES LONDON

Digital Intermediate Colourist PETER DOYLE

Digital Intermediate Producer ANDREW DEARNLEY

Digital Intermediate Editor GRACE LAN

End Titles By MATT CURTIS

 

Visual Effects by SONY PICTURES IMAGEWORKS INC.

Visual Effects Supervisor

DANIEL KRAMER

 

Senior Visual Effects Producer

ERIC SCOTT

 

Animation Supervisor

STEVE NICHOLS

 

Digital Effects Supervisor

KEE-SUK HAHN

 

CG Supervisors

KARL EDWARD HERBST

 

 

MATTHEW WELFORD

 

 

 

CRAIG WENTWORTH

 

 

Character Animators

BENJAMIN CINELLI

MICHAEL KIMMEL

CEDRIC LO

ADRIAN MILLINGTON

KEITH W SMITH

JAMES R WARD

OZ GANI

JULIUS KWAN

CRAIG MCPHERSON

RYAN PAGE

ZACHARY TOROK

ERIC R HUANG

PEER LEMMERS

JEREMY MESANA

ATSUSHI SATO

CHRIS TOST

 

 

CG and Lighting Compositing Artists

GEETA BASANTANI

MARCUS CARTER

CHRISTINA DRAHOS

CRAIG FEIFAREK

PHILLIP GILES

STEVE HAWKEN

BENJAMIN KREBS

SAMUEL LEE

WILL MCCRATE

CAMIL PLANELLA PANISELLO

KATYA RUSLANOVA

BRET ST. CLAIR

WILL TOWLE

DORIS WANG

LYNN BASAS

BLANDINE CHANTEUR

RYAN DUHAIME

FRANK FIESER

NATHALIE GONTHIER

LUC JULIEN

MICHAEL LASKER

TODD LIDDIARD

THIERRY MULLER

SCOTT PRIOR

RYAN SMOLAREK

PRAPANCH SWAMY

SIMON TWINE

BOB WIATR

BRETT BRONSON

MARIE VICTORIA DENOGA

FISH ESSENFELD

BRIAN FISHER

ODED GRANOT

BRIAN KLOC

NICOLA LAVENDER

LAURENCE LOK

ADELE NG

DANIEL RUBIN

KEVIN SOULS

SEBASTIEN TESSIER

PIETER VAN HOUTE

CHRIS WOOD

Design and Build Artists

DENNIS BREDOW

WILLIAM ECKROAT

MARVIN KIM

STEVEN BROWNING

EDWIN FABROS

DAN SHEERIN

TIMOTHY COLEMAN

TERRENCE ROBERTSON-FALL

NELSON SOUSA

CG Effects Artists

STEVE (STELIOS) AVOUJAGELI

LUCIO FLORES

INJOON HWANG

SIMON LEWIS

MIKE MARCUZZI

SAM RICKLES

WILL CUNNINGHAM

PAWEL GROCHOLA

ATSUSHI IKARASHI

VIKTOR LUNDQVIST

HIROAKI NARITA

JASON SIMMONS

DAVID R. DAVIES

JEFFREY CHARLES HIGGINS

KEVIN KITCHEL

NIKKI MAKAR

SIEGFRIED OSTERTAG

PAUL WAGGONER

Pipeline and Layout Artists

JOSÉ ENRIQUE ASTACIO JR.

STEFAAN SENNA CONTRERAS

JOHN GIFFONI

CRAIG FRAZER SIMPSON

JOHN BUNT

RYAN SARAH CUSHMAN

JOHN HOOD

BRIAN WALTERS

JOHN CLARK

NATHAN ERIKSEN

JOSHUA OCHOA

 

 

Production

EVA ABRAMYCHEVA

KEVIN COATS

DEBBIE DENISE

CHRIS HEBERT

ASHLEY KOONS

STEPHANIE MUYCO

MAIRIN PLATT

MAX SMYTHE

NOOSHIN VEGH

THOMAS H CORE

DANIELA GIANGRANDE

WOOJO JEON

SUZANNE LABRIE

GREGORY NEWMAN

KAILIN RYAN

MARISSA TOMAS

CLIFF WANG

JESUS DE SANTIAGO

JULIE M GROLL

ALYSE JOSEPH

RAYMOND MCLENDON

MARSHALL PETERSEN

CAREY ANN SMITH

JEAN TSAI

JEREMIE WINSLOW

MICHELLE LYNNE BRENNER

ALLEN CAPPUCCILLI

Additional Visual Effects

FX3X

 

YANNIX (Thailand)

Visual Effects by FRAMESTORE

Visual Development

Art Director and Lead Concept

KEVIN JENKINS

 

Concept Artists

RICHARD ANDERSON

MARTIN MACRAE

JON MCCOY

JOSEPH MCLAMN

BRANDON NORRIS

SAM ROWAN

STEPHEN TAPPIN

GEMMA THOMPSON

 

Visual Effects Supervisor

JONATHAN FAWKNER

 

Additional Visual Effects Supervisor

CHRISTIAN KAESTNER

 

CG Supervisors

ALEXIS WAJSBROT

NEIL WEATHERLEY

Visual Effects Producers

CHLOË GRYSOLE

DANIELLE LEGOVICH

Visual Effects Production

GRAHAM MARTIN

KATIE GOODWIN

SANDRA GERMAIN

ISABELL MAYRHOFER

NATALIE CLAIRE MILLER

TALIA FELBER

JOHN SZEBEGYINSKI

SABRINA GAGNON

WASSILA LMOUCI

Digital Artists

AARON LEAR

FREDERIKKE GLICK

MAXWELL ADAMS

ADAM GOLDSTEIN

GABRIEL TREMBLAY-BEAUVAIS

MICHAEL BAKER

ADAM PARKER

GARY NISBET

MICHAEL BORHI

ADRIAN NURSE

GAVIN MCKENZIE

MICHAEL HAVART

ALAN WOODS

GERAINT WRIGHT

MICHAEL SHIRRA

ALBAN KASIKCI

GUILLAUME FRADIN

MICKAËL LÉGER

ALES GARGULAK

HORACIO MENDOZA

NESTOR COSTA

ALEX JADFARD

HYUNCHUL JUNG

NICK HAMPSHIRE

ALEX RONCO

IAN ALLARD

NICOLAS BORENS

ALVIN YAP

IAN FELLOWS

NICOLAS LEROY

AMINA TAN

JAMES NICHOLL

NIGEL RAFTER

ANELIA ASPARUHOVA

JASON BAKER

NIÑA LAURELES

ASHISH DEWAN

JEAN-BAPTISTE GODIN

PATRICK COMTOIS

BENJAMIN MAGANA

JEFF NEWTON

PATRICK REDMOND

BJARNI BRAGASON

JEREMIE DUCROCQ

PER KAREFELT

BJOERN GOTTWALD

JEREMIE LODOMEZ

PHILIP MORRIS

BRAD SILBY

JEREMY SEGUIN

PHILIPPE DAVID

BRETT MARGULES

JEROME BOUTROUX

PIERPAOLO NAVARINI

BRYON CALDWELL

JÉRÔME COLLOMBIER

PIOTR BAREJKO

CAROLINE THOUMIRE

JERRY TUNG

RAUL PEREZ

CHARLIE BENNETT

JONATHAN CARRÉ

REINHOLD RITTINGER

CHRIS AHRENS

JUAN LUIS SANCHEZ

RENE ALLEGRETTI

CHRIS NEWMAN

JULIAN HUTCHENS

RICHARD COURTMAN

CHRIS PAGE

JULIEN LEGAY

RICHARD HIGHAM

CHRISTOPHE PACAUD

JUSTIN LONG

ROB GARNER

DAMIEN MACE

KEN SHIMIZU

ROB RICHARDSON

DANIEL BRYANT

LARS ERIK ERIKSEN

RUSSELL HORTH

DANNY LÉVESQUE

LASZLO MATES

SAM OSBORNE

DAVID CUNNINGHAM

LAURENT LABAN

SAMER SALLMAN

DAVID SIMPSON

LIANNE FORBES

SAMUEL POIRIER

DENYS SHCHUKIN

LUCIEN FOSTIER

SIMON THISTLETHWAITE

DILLAN NICHOLLS

LUKAS NIKLAUS

SLAV KRAVCHENKO

DUARTE VICTORINO

MARIANO MENDIBURU

STEVEN MOOR

DUNCAN RANSOM

MARK OSBORNE

STEVEN MOORE

ERIC NOEL

MARTIN PÉLISSIER

TOM FONVILLARS

FELIPE CANFORA

MATTHEW TWYFORD

VLADISLAV AKHTYRSKIY

FRANK D’IORIO

MATTHIEU GOUTTE

WANG YANG

Visual Effects by MPC UK & Vancouver

 

GARY BROZENICH

MATT MIDDLETON

PHILIP GREENLOW

STEPHANE PARIS

DARYL SAWCHUK

JOSEPH ZAKI

MOHAMMED ASEEM

GRAHAM ASHWORTH

SANJAY BALIGA

JAMES BURKE

HUBERT CHAN

ANN CHOW

STEPHEN DAVIES

MARC ENGLISH

ALEXANDER ERIKSSON

JULIA FERGUSON

CARL JACKSON

MATT KOWALISZYN

SUJAY KUMAR

VAMSI MEDURI

ARTURO ORGAZ CASADO

SANJAY PANCHAL

GEORGE PEMBREY

BRIAN RITZ

SHIV SWAIN

MANUEL VALDEZ-MENDIA

BRIAN YU

 

Visual Effects by CINESITE

Visual Effects Supervisor

SIMON STANLEY-CLAMP

 

Animation Supervisor

EAMONN BUTLER

 

VFX Production

DIANE KINGSTON

HELENE BECOURT

AYMERIC PERCEVAL

ARTEMIS OIKONOMOPOULOU

THOMAS DYG

MATTHEW D’ANGIBAU

CHRIS LEARMONTH

PETER CLAYTON

PAUL LEE

RICHARD BOYLE

ROSS COLGAN

GRAHAME CURTIS

MAEVE EYDMANN

NIKOS GATOS

TOM O’FLAHERTY

BENOIT LEGROSS

NICOLETTE NEWMAN

JANE PATON

VENETIA PENNA

OLLIE WEIGALL

RUGGERO TOMASINO

JAMES STONE

VINCENT TECHER

CHRISTIAN POULLAY

ARRON TURNBULL

ALEX WEBB

ADAM BAILEY

CHRISTOPHER PUCHTA

DAN HARROD

Visual Effects by RODEO FX, Montreal, Canada

 

VFX Producers SEBASTIEN MOREAU JORDAN SOLES

VFX Supervisor MATTHEW ROULEAU

 

Visual Effects by NVIZIBLE

 

MATT KASMIR

KRIS WRIGHT

KIM PHELAN

CHRIS LUNNEY

ADAN ROWLAND

CIARAN KEENAN

STEFAN GERSTHEIMER

MARTIN CHAMNEY

ZACH DU TOIT

SAM CHURCHIIL

CHARLOTTE LARIVE

SIMON-PIERRE PUECH

JEREMEY HEY

JOHN KAY

TOM BALOGH

 

Pre-visualization by THE THIRD FLOOR, INC.

Previs Supervisor

ALBERT CHENG

 

Digital Artists

MARGAUX DURAND-RIVAL

MICHELLE BLOK

NICHOLAS FREESTON

CLAUDIO CLAMENTE

IAN DIFFER

JOANNA MIGODZINSKA

CHRIS OLSEN

FLORIAN PARROT

REBECCA ROSE

JACOPO SEBASTIANI

MATTHEW SMART

 

3D Conversion by PRIME FOCUS

Creative Supervisor

MERZIN TAVARIA

Stereo Supervisor

RICHARD W. BAKER

Visual Effects Producers

MATTHEW BRISTOWE STEPHEN MASCARENHAS

Stereo Production

BARRY O’BRIEN JIMMY PHILIP VALERIA ANDINO

FRANKLIN MASCARENHAS VIKKI CHAPMAN RICHARD EDWARDS

BAKSHAD AMROLIA BEN HARRISON CHRIS PRESTON-BARNES

GUS MELTON RICHARD PRING JAMES CUNDILL

LASZLO RIKKER JANAK GRIFFIN-RAI LUKE GRAY

EOIN GREENHAM VILI IVANOV ROBIN EMERSON

OLIVER ALLEN-WIELEBNOWSKI FRANCESCO CAPONE ARTURS VAITILAVICS

DHIRAJ S SUKHEJA PARMINDER CHADDA CHRISTOPHER MAW

PUNEET SAMRA AOIFE GREENHAM DANIELLE REIS

BHAVESH MANSUKH RANK MARC BRZEZICKI DAVEY ATKINSON

HARSHAD MASURKAR ALAN TORMEY ESME COLEMAN

MAHESH PATIL ALBENA IVANOVA HERNAN BARROS

OMKAR S RAHATE ALEX HOPKINS JASON HAYES

SANKET KULKARNI AMELIA BRAEKKE-DYER JEMMEL MATHESON

WAGH RAHUL RAMESH ANDREW BRITTAIN VISHAL PATEL

SANJIV.SABLE ANDREW EMERSON GOURAV GUPTA

AVDESH SHUKLA BROOKE MCGOWAN ROHAN TIRKEY

MANDEEP SINGH TOM DUCKETT DIXA HEMANT DESAI

SOMIEL KAPRE TRISTAN NIETO JIGNESH VINODBHAI SOLANKI

AKASH MANGAVKAR RAJAT ROY MAYANK MISHRA

LAXMAN GHUMLA KAT KELLY RAKHEE GHOSH

ROMI KIRAN JOSE DAVID PERLA VENKATESWARLU

KEVIN MALIAKAL KAREN ELLIOTT SHREERAJ GOPI

SACHIN PATIDAR KEVIN POWER SUBHADIP.MALAKAR

PRIYAL MAHADIK MARIA ASIM ALI ANKIT VYAS

MANU JAIN MOHIT VARDE TARUN JAIN

B HARSHAVARDHAN NARESH RAWAT ROHIT GUJAR

HIMANSHU AJMERA PETER BARTFAY GUFRAN KHAN

MANISH G CHAVAN ROHIT KORGAONKAR NITIN KUMAR BAHL

NITIN RAVINDRA CHAVAN SHELDON BRATHWAITE SAVIO CRUZ

RAJAN GULATI STEPHANIE COOPER PRANJAL SAXENA

VINIT VITHAL GOHIL PIYUSH JAIN RIYAZ NAGPURWALA

SWAPNIL KULKARNI RAVI KUMAR SINGH BHAVIN VORA

AMOL PAWAR RAVINDER SINGH BISHNOI VIKRAM DHARANKAR

BINOY THOMAS SUDARSHAN DHARMARAJAN ASHWIN D’SOUZA

SANDEEP GAMRE GIRISH TAKALE RICHARD BEST

JAY JOHNSON JOCELYN KONRAD LEE GEORGE CASTALDINI

DHRUV UPPAL LOUIS CHRISTOU HARRY WOOLACOTT

 

 

Soundtrack Album on WATERTOWER MUSIC

 

“Massive Mellow”

Written and performed by Daniel Lenz

Courtesy of RipTide Music

“Railroad Track”

Written by Willy Moon and Curtis Lundy

Performed by Willy Moon

Courtesy of Universal-Island Records Ltd

Under license from Universal Music Operations Ltd

“Trip Into The Light”

Written by Jeremy Lublin, Stephan Lublin, Craig Bonich, Patrick Meyer and Nathan Post

Performed by Jeremy & The Harlequins

Courtesy of Harlequin Music

By arrangement with Secret Road Music Services, Inc.

Love Me Again”

Written by Stephen Booker and John Newman

Performed by John Newman

Courtesy of Universal-Island Records Ltd

Under licence from Universal Music Operations Ltd

With the participation of the Province of British Columbia Production Services Tax Credit

QUEBEC (logo)

Filmed at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, England, Elstree Film Studios England

The Producers would like to thank:

The Greater London Authority – Mayor’s Office, Heathrow Airport Limited, Westminster Film Office,

The National Gallery, James Waller – The Metropolitan Police, Transport for London, Royal Parks,

Banqueting House, The Louvre Museum,

Pyramid Architect Mr. Ieoh Ming Pei

AFP NEWS FOOTAGE ©2014 AFP

CORBIS

NBC UNIVERSAL ARCHIVES

Courtesy CNN

ITN SOURCE

Footage Courtesy of ABCNEWS VIDEOSOURCE

ABC SPORTS

BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION

Camera Equipment supplied by

PANAVISION UK

KODAK Motion Picture Products

Color and Prints by TECHNICOLOR ®

DOLBY Digital (logo) DATASAT Digital (logo)

Approved # 49008 (emblem) (IATSE LABEL)

Motion Picture Association of America

© 2014 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., WV Films IV LLC and Ratpac-Dune Entertainment LLC—U.S., Canada, Bahamas & Bermuda

© 2014 Village Roadshow Films (BVI) Limited, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and Ratpac-Dune Entertainment LLC – – All Other Territories

 

EDGE OF TOMORROW

3 Arts logo

Warner Bros. Distribution Closing Cloud Shield Logo

 

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