The Brooklyn Museum Announces Advance Schedule of Exhibitions through June 2019

Comment Off 12 Views
The Brooklyn Museum Announces Advance

Schedule of Exhibitions through June 2019
The Brooklyn Museum is pleased to announce our advance schedule of exhibitions through June 2019, including a major show dedicated to the work and life of Mexican modernist Frida Kahlo; a number of focused and emerging artist presentations; and the first-ever survey exhibition to explore the color work of twentieth-century photographer Garry Winogrand. In addition, and in conjunction with the citywide commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, we will showcase a group of more than twenty contemporary LGBTQ+ artists working in response to the legacy of the riots.

“We’re incredibly excited for a roster of exhibitions next season that underpin our mission to be a catalyst for courageous conversations about art and our world,” says Anne Pasternak, Shelby White and Leon Levy Director, Brooklyn Museum. “We’ll be showcasing rarely seen aspects of our incredible collection, highlighting iconic twentieth-century master artists like Frida Kahlo and Garry Winogrand, and giving special attention to emerging talents Eric N. Mack and Liz Johnson Artur, who share our values to expand the art historical canon.”

2019 Exhibitions Schedule:
 
Eric N. Mack: Lemme walk across the room
January 11-July 7, 2019
Great Hall, 1st Floor
The Brooklyn Museum spotlights emerging artist Eric N. Mack in his first solo museum show in New York City. Mack will transform the Brooklyn Museum’s Great Hall with a site-responsive installation of new and existing textile-based works hung, mounted, and draped in rich conversation with the classical architecture of the space. Mack presents painting as a living and multisensory practice. His work explores the boundaries of painting, sculpture, and fashion, and dynamically reflects and reframes everyday experience. Fashion and musical performance components further activate the exhibition.
Eric N. Mack: Lemme walk across the room is curated by Ashley James, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum. This emerging artist is presented at the Brooklyn Museum with the support of Deutsche Bank.
Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving
February 8-May 12, 2019
Robert E. Blum Gallery, 1st Floor


Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the largest U.S. exhibition in ten years devoted to the art and life of Frida Kahlo, and the first in the United States to display a collection of her personal possessions from the Casa Azul (Blue House), the artist’s lifelong home in Mexico City. The objects, ranging from clothing, jewelry, and cosmetics to letters and orthopedic corsets, will be presented alongside works by Kahlo — including ten key paintings and a selection of drawings — as well as photographs of the artist, all from the celebrated Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art. Related historical film and ephemera, as well as objects from the Brooklyn Museum’s extensive holdings of Mesoamerican art, are also included. Offering an intimate glimpse into the artist’s life, Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving explores how politics, gender, clothing, national identities, and disability played a part in defining Kahlo’s self-presentation in her work and life.
Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is organized by Catherine Morris, Sackler Senior Curator for the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and Lisa Small, Senior Curator, European Art, Brooklyn Museum, and is based on an exhibition at the V&A London. The Brooklyn exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Banco de México Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, and The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art and The Vergel Foundation.

One: Egúngún
February 8-August 18, 2019
Ingrassia Galleries, 4th Floor
Focusing on a highlight from the Brooklyn Museum’s renowned collection of historical African arts, One: Egúngún tells the life story of a singular early twentieth-century Yorùbá masquerade costume (egúngún). Using new research and multiple perspectives, the presentation emphasizes the global connections and contemporary contexts of African masquerades. Made during the early twentieth century in southwestern Nigeria, this egúngún is composed of over three hundred different textiles from Africa, Europe, and Asia, which swirl in motion during festival dances honoring departed ancestors. Also on view are four distinctive West African textiles and garments that demonstrate the role of cloth in Yorùbá belief and aesthetics. The presentation is accompanied by photographs and footage of Yorùbá masquerade festivals; related textiles; and filmed interviews with Nigerian scholars, contemporary artists, and masquerade practitioners. At their request, this exhibition will honor the name of the Lekewọgbẹ family of Ògbómọ̀ṣọ́ — the makers of this mask — by telling the story of their family’s masquerade heritage in their own words, incorporating video filmed at their compound in August 2018.
One: Egúngún is curated by Kristen Windmuller-Luna, Sills Family Consulting Curator, African Arts, Brooklyn Museum. One Brooklyn is made possible by a generous contribution from JPMorgan Chase & Co.
Garry Winogrand: Color
May 3-August 18, 2019
Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor


Garry Winogrand: Color is the first-ever exhibition dedicated to the nearly forgotten color photographs of Garry Winogrand (1928-1984), one of the most influential photographers of the twentieth century. The presentation will feature an installation of slide shows comprising more than 400 rarely or never-before-seen photographs that demonstrate the artist’s commitment to and experiments with color. Though primarily known for his black-and-white images that pioneered a “snapshot aesthetic” in contemporary art, Winogrand also produced more than 45,000 color slides between the early 1950s and late 1960s. In 1967 he included a projection of 80 color transparencies in the landmark exhibition New Documents at the Museum of Modern Art, though the installation was removed after the projector malfunctioned and little is known about its content. The exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum includes rotating projections of the lush color photographs Winogrand took of New York City and elsewhere in the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. By presenting this group of largely unknown color work, the exhibition sheds new light on the development of color photography before 1970.
Garry Winogrand: Color is curated by Drew Sawyer, Phillip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Curator of Photography, Brooklyn Museum, with Michael Almereyda and Susan Kismaric. Leadership support for this exhibition is provided by Phillip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Charitable Trust.
Liz Johnson Artur
May 3-August 18, 2019
Ingrassia Galleries, 4th Floor
For more than thirty years, Liz Johnson Artur has been creating a photographic representation of people of African descent across the globe. The Russian-Ghanaian artist’s intimate pictures capture the everyday beauty and distinctiveness of individuals and communities that she has encountered on the streets, in restaurants and clubs, or at public gatherings. Johnson Artur’s first solo museum exhibition will present an installation of photographs, sketchbooks, and films drawn from the London-based photographer’s vast “Black Balloon Archive,” which she began during a trip to Brooklyn in 1986.
Liz Johnson Artur is curated by Drew Sawyer, Phillip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Curator of Photography, Brooklyn Museum. This emerging artist is presented at the Brooklyn Museum with the support of Deutsche Bank.
“Nobody Promised You Tomorrow”: Art 50 Years After Stonewall
May 3-December 8, 2019
Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor


“Nobody Promised You Tomorrow”: Art 50 Years After Stonewall presents a group of more than twenty LGBTQ+ artists born after the 1969 Stonewall Uprising and working, five decades later, in the hometown of the riots. Borrowing its title from the rallying words of transgender artist and activist Marsha P. Johnson, “Nobody Promised You Tomorrow” commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the multiday rebellion, which was ignited by a routine police raid on a New York City gay bar, The Stonewall Inn, by exploring its profound legacy in contemporary art and visual culture. The exhibition aims to expand our understanding of the Stonewall Uprising beyond the image of protesters in the streets to consider the everyday acts of care that underpin such public activism. The featured artists form part of the vanguard of queer artistic production, and include Mark Aguhar, Felipe Baeza, David Antonio Cruz, Mohammed Fayaz, Juliana Huxtable, Linda LaBeija, Elle Pérez, Tuesday Smillie, Tourmaline, and Sasha Wortzel, among others.
“Nobody Promised You Tomorrow”: Art 50 Years After Stonewall is curated by Margo Cohen Ristorucci, Public Programs Coordinator; Lindsay C. Harris, Teen Programs Manager; Carmen Hermo, Associate Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art; Allie Rickard, Curatorial Assistant, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art; and Lauren Argentina Zelaya, Assistant Curator, Public Programs, Brooklyn Museum.
Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper
June 21-October 13, 2019
Robert E. Blum Gallery, 1st Floor
Marking more than a hundred years of collecting European works on paper, the Brooklyn Museum celebrates masterworks from the collection-many on view for the first time — in Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper. Ranging from spontaneous preliminary studies to fully realized compositions, the works on view will feature intimate portraits, biting social satire, fantastical visions, vivid landscapes, and more, arranged thematically to emphasize affinities and ruptures across centuries of artistic practice. The exhibition will include over 120 works by William Blake, Rosa Bonheur, Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Albrecht Dürer, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Paul Gauguin, Francisco Goya, Vincent van Gogh, William Hogarth, Kathe Kollwitz, Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, among others.
Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper is curated by Lisa Small, Senior Curator, European Art, Brooklyn Museum.
One: Titus Kaphar
June 21-October 13, 2019
Robert E. Blum Gallery, 1st Floor
Opening in conversation with Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper is Titus Kaphar’s large-scale painting, Shifting the Gaze, famously completed live onstage during a TED talk in April 2017. The work is based on a seventeenth- century Dutch painting by Frans Hals, and powerfully reconsiders the representation of Black people in the history of Western art. In completing the work, Kaphar painted over a Caucasian European family in broad white strokes, thereby shifting our focus onto a young Black servant and drawing attention to those who have traditionally gone unseen and unheard.
One: Titus Kaphar is curated by Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Senior Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum. One Brooklyn is made possible by a generous contribution from JPMorgan Chase & Co.
Illustrated, from top:
 
Eric N. Mack in his studio, 2018. Digital photograph. (Photo: Lula Hyers, © Lula Hyers)
Nickolas Muray (American, born Hungary, 1892-1965). Frida in New York, 1946; printed 2006. Carbon pigment print, image: 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Emily Winthrop Miles Fund, 2010.80. Photo by Nickolas Muray, © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)
Yorùbá artist. Egúngún Masquerade Dance Costume (paka egúngún), circa 1920-48. Lekewọgbẹ compound, Ògbómọ̀ṣọ́, Ọ̀yọ́ State, Nigeria. Cotton, wool, wood, silk, synthetic textiles (including viscose rayon and acetate), indigo dye, and aluminum, 58 x 7 x 70 in. (147.3 x 17.8 x 177.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Sam Hilu, 1998.125
Garry Winogrand (American, 1928-1984). Untitled (New York), 1960. 35mm color slide. Collection of the Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona. © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Liz Johnson Artur (Russian-Ghanaian, born 1964). Brother Michael Peckham, 2013. Chromogenic print, 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 60.9 cm). © Liz Johnson Artur
Tuesday Smillie (American, born 1981). S.T.A.R., 2012. Watercolor, collage on board, 9 1/2 x 11 in. (24.1 x 27.9 cm). Courtesy of the artist. © Tuesday Smillie
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Head of a Young Man (Tête de Jeune Homme), 1923. Grease crayon on pink Michallet laid paper, 24 1/2 x 18 5/8 in. (62.2 x 47.3 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Carll H. de Silver Fund, 39.18. © 2018 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Titus Kaphar (American, born 1976). Shifting the Gaze, 2017. Oil on canvas, 83 x 103 1/4 in. (210.8 x 262.3 cm). Brooklyn Museum, William K. Jacobs Jr., Fund, 2017.34. © Titus Kaphar (Photo: Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery).
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
In : Events

About the author

Editor of Don411.com Media website.
Use code TOKENFL2018 and get $10 cashback
Free Newsletter Updated Daily