The Boston Conservatory’s Piano Masters Series: Sept. 30 – Awadgin Pratt; Nov. 4 – Michael Lewin; Dec. 2 – David Korevaar; Jan. 27 – Janice Weber; March 3- John O’Conor; April 7 – Yevgeny Sudbin, $15 general admission with discounts available

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The Boston Conservatory’s popular Piano Masters Series returns starting Tuesday, Sept. 30 with international award-winning artist, Awadgin Pratt, marking his first Boston performance in more than a decade. Now in its 15th year, the Piano Masters Series continues to offer the opportunity to hear a diverse, fascinating array of acclaimed pianists in rare Boston appearances, performing in an intimate concert hall.

 

This year’s Piano Masters schedule:

Sept. 30Awadgin Pratt, winner of the Naumberg International Piano Competition and Avery Fisher Career Grant, having also played at the White House

Nov. 4Michael Lewin, artistic director of the Piano Masters Series, whose recent recording of Beau Soir has become a classical best-seller

Dec. 2David Korevaar, one of the most intellectually curious, versatile and refined musicians in America

Jan. 27Janice Weber, member of The Boston Conservatory piano faculty, who has been called “a concert pianist of cliffhanging panache and daredevil brilliance” by The Wall Street Journal

March 3John O’Conor, eminent Irish pianist, returning to the Conservatory for a second consecutive year, following a triumphant all-Beethoven recital last season

April 7Yevgeny Sudbin, playing in his Boston debut, and international sensation who has been hailed by The Daily Telegraph as “potentially one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century”

 

Each Piano Masters Series concert is $15 general admission with discounts available. All performances take place on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. at The Boston Conservatory’s Seully Hall at 8 The Fenway. Tickets for the fall Piano Masters performances are available to purchase through the Conservatory Box Office at 31 Hemenway St. or by calling (617) 912-9222 or online at www.bostonconservatory.edu/tickets.

 

The Boston Conservatory Piano Masters Series returns for 15th season with world-renowned artists

 

(BOSTON—Sept. 16, 2014) The Boston Conservatory’s popular Piano Masters Series returns on Tuesday, Sept. 30 with international award-winning artist, Awadgin Pratt, marking his first Boston performance in more than a decade. Now in its 15th year, the Piano Masters Series continues to offer the opportunity to hear a diverse, fascinating array of acclaimed pianists in rare Boston appearances, performing in an intimate concert hall.

 

Awadgin Pratt is a winner of the Naumberg International Piano Competition and Avery Fisher Career Grant, having also played at the White House. Michael Lewin, artistic director of the Piano Masters Series, whose recent recording of Beau Soir has become a classical best-seller, will take the stage on Nov. 4. On Dec. 2, one of the most intellectually curious, versatile and refined musicians in America, David Korevaar, will perform. The spring season begins on Jan. 27 with Janice Weber, a member of The Boston Conservatory piano faculty, who has been called “a concert pianist of cliffhanging panache and daredevil brilliance” by The Wall Street Journal. Eminent Irish pianist John O’Conor returns to the Conservatory on March 3 for a second consecutive year, following a triumphant all-Beethoven recital last season. The Piano Masters Series season will conclude on April 7 with the Boston debut of international sensation Yevgeny Sudbin, who has been hailed by The Daily Telegraph as “potentially one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century.”

 

“The artists we bring in for this series are among the top pianists in the world, and they are ones Boston audiences do not frequently get a chance to hear,” said Lewin. “It is a true coup to present Yevgeny Sudbin in his Boston recital debut, offering music-lovers here the first chance to hear this young Russian who is enjoying a meteoric international career. John O’Conor is returning—following a standing-room-only recital last season—to perform a fascinating Beethoven program that couples the rarely played Bagatelles op. 33 with the mighty Diabelli Variations, a summit of the piano repertoire. It promises to be a magnificent season of great music-making by master pianists.”

 

Each Piano Masters Series concert is $15 general admission with discounts available. All performances take place on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. at The Boston Conservatory’s Seully Hall at 8 The Fenway. Tickets for the fall Piano Masters performances are available to purchase through the Conservatory Box Office at 31 Hemenway St. or by calling (617) 912-9222 or online at www.bostonconservatory.edu/tickets.

 

The Boston Conservatory also presents more than 600 other performances and recitals by students, faculty and guest artists every year. From staged to semi-staged theater, dance and opera performances to instrumental and voice recitals, there is something for everyone. For a complete schedule, visit www.bostonconservatory.edu/perform.
Awadagin Pratt
Sept. 30
A protean musician known for unique performances of granitic integrity, American pianist Awadagin Pratt has achieved great visibility and worldwide recognition since winning the Naumburg International Piano Competition and the Avery Fisher Career Grant.
BACH-BUSONI: Chaconne
BRAHMS: Variations on a Theme by Handel
LISZT: Sonata in b minor

Michael Lewin
Nov. 4
Michael Lewin, artistic director of The Boston Conservatory Piano Masters Series, has devoted great attention to Debussy this year, making two new recordings and performing his piano works widely in concert. Beau Soir, the first disc to be released, has garnered extraordinary international press and has already become a classical best-seller.
DEBUSSY (arr. Koji Attwood for Michael Lewin): Beau SoirNuits D’Etoiles
SCRIABIN: Sonata-Fantasy No. 2, op. 19
SCHUBERT: Fantasy in C Major (“Wanderer” Fantasy)
DEBUSSY: 12 Préludes, Book 1; L’isle joyeuse
David Korevaar
Dec. 2
One of America’s most probing, intellectually curious, versatile and pianistically-refined musicians, David Korevaar’s mastery extends from J.S. Bach to Lowell Liebermann. Featuring a fascinating presentation of French works and Schubert’s monumental Sonata in A Major.
FAURÉ: Nocturne No. 7 in c-sharp minor
HARSÁNYI: Trois pièces de danse
POULENC: Les soirées de nazelles
SCHUBERT: Sonata in A Major, D. 959

Janice Weber
Jan. 27
Janice Weber, member of The Boston Conservatory piano faculty, has a fascinating and unique artistic profile with her glittering explorations of rare romantics, virtuoso piano transcriptions, and wide-ranging 20th century interests.
HIDEMITH: Piano Sonata No. 3 in B-flat Major
PROKOFIEV: Visions fugitives, op.22
NIKOLAI KAPUSTIN: Variations, op. 41
LISZT: Selected late works
STRAUSS-GODOWSKY: Die Fledermaus

John O’Conor
March 3
After John O’Conor’s triumphant all-Beethoven recital last season, the Conservatory is thrilled that the popular Irish master is returning with Beethoven, the composer that he is so associated with. The program consists of rarely heard Bagatelles, op. 33 and the mighty Diabelli Variations.
ALL-BEETHOVEN PROGRAM:
Bagatelles, op. 33
Diabelli Variations, op. 120

Yevgeny Sudbin
April 7
Young Russian pianist Yevgeny Sudbin has created an international sensation, enjoying a meteoric international career performing with major orchestras in the most prestigious concert series and earning raves for his CD recordings. The Piano Masters Series is proud to present Yevgeny Sudbin’s Boston debut.
SCARLATTI: Sonatas
MUSSORGSKY: Pictures at an Exhibition
CHOPIN: Nocturne, op. 27, No. 1
SCRIABIN: Sonata No. 9  “Black Mass”
MOZART/SUDBIN: “Lacrimosa” from Requiem
SAINT-SAENS: Danse Macabre  (Liszt-Horowitz-Sudbin)

 

 

About The Boston Conservatory

The Boston Conservatory trains exceptional, young performing artists for careers that enrich and transform the human experience. Known for its intimate and supportive multi-disciplinary environment, The Boston Conservatory offers fully accredited graduate and undergraduate programs in music, dance and musical theater, and presents more than 600 performances each year by students, faculty and guest artists. Since its founding in 1867, The Boston Conservatory has shared its talent and creativity with the city of Boston, the region and the nation, and continues to grow today as a vibrant community of artists and educators. For more information, visit www.bostonconservatory.edu.

 

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