7 Days of Genius at 92Y

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7 DAYS OF GENIUS at 92Y
–  March 5-12 –

A GLOBAL CONVERSATION ON HOW GENIUS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD FOR THE BETTER

MSNBC, Marquee Media Partner

Genius Ideas in…
Artificial Intelligence • Genetics • Politics & Policy • The Global Economy • Brain Science & Medicine • Entertainment & Culture

Featuring: Ray Kurzweil with Neil deGrasse Tyson • Kickstarter’s Yancey Strickler • David Petraeus • Steven Pinker • Martine Rothblatt • Jaron Lanier • Gary Vaynerchuk • Industrial Light and Magic • Instagram’s Mike Krieger • Esther Dyson & Freeman Dyson • One Day University • Google’s Jared Cohen and More

www.92Y.org/Genius
#THATSGENIUS

92Y’s third annual 7 Days of Genius festival returns on March 5, with 20-plus events at 92Y, online content and competitions, and events curated and hosted by partner organizations in New York, other U.S. cities and countries around the world, adding up to a week-long global conversation about genius. Events are taking place in Athens, Guatemala City, and London; Global Minimum is holding innovation workshops in Kenya, South Africa and Sierra Leone; and Impact Hub is hosting events in Mexico City and Rome. Here in New York, 7 Days of Genius events are being presented by the Jewish Museum and Central Synagogue (both Einstein-related), as well as Impact Hub NYC and Raise the Bar.

92Y’s roster of speakers includes futurist Ray Kurzweill with Neil deGrasse Tyson (3/7); tech guru Jaron Lanier and CEO Martine Rothblatt in an Intelligence Squared US debate on artificial intelligence (3/9); an evening with Industrial Light and Magic (think Star Wars) (3/10); entrepreneurs Gary Vaynerchuk (3/6), Instagram co-founder Mike Krieger (3/11) and Kickstarter’s CEO Yancey Strickler (3/9); Sessions on Mozart, Michelangelo and Shakespeare in partnership with One Day University (3/12); public policy innovators Alec Ross and Google’s Jared Cohen; (3/6) and scientists and mathematicians like Stephen Strogatz (3/11), Eric Kandel (3/7) and Stephen Hsu (3/10). There are also family-friendly performances and workshops and an exhibit celebrating anonymous geniuses in 92Y’s Weill Art Gallery (3/5 & 3/6).

As a Marquee Media Partner, MSNBC presents programming and content during the week to further the conversation and explore genius. The content is to be streamed live on www.msnbc.com/genius throughout the week. Also, MSNBC is currently leading the second annual Ultimate Genius Showdown, a month-long bracket challenge that kicked off in early February, where 32 world influencers compete in the categories of politics, innovation, science and morality to be named the Ultimate Genius. Check it out here.

In conjunction with 7 Days of Genius, Big Think is producing content on the theme of “anonymous genius,” with an emphasis on overlooked female geniuses. Big Think also plans to offer an original 7 Days of Genius video series with Maria Popova from Brain Pickings.

 

7 Days of Genius receives generous support from individuals and organizations, including the John Templeton Foundation.

COOKING, SCIENCE AND EDUCATION: NATURE’S FARM-ACY
Sat, Mar 5, 7 pm, from $29
Bill Yosses, the official executive pastry chef at the White House from 2007 to 2014, and Vayu Maini Rekdal, chef, scientist and educator, demonstrate and discuss the scientific principles behind culinary processes. How do emulsions and foams work, and why do certain ingredient substitutes work like magic? How do polymers relate to baking and what is super-cooling? Bill and Vayu also show how the relationship between food and science can promote wellness and scientific curiosity.
Class | THE GENIUS OF MILES DAVIS
Sun, Mar 6, 2:30 pm, from $45
One of 92Y’s most beloved teachers, Louis Rosen, explores the musical genius of Miles Davis — the legendary trumpeter and bandleader, explorer of new musical paths who would be celebrating his 90th birthday next year. Along with his extraordinary musical groups, Davis was at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, from his stint with Charlie Parker’s band in the mid-1940s to the Birth of the Cool recordings at the end of that decade; from his orchestral jazz recordings with arranger Gil Evans (Porgy & Bess and Sketches of Spain) to the modal jazz of Kind of Blue and the 1960s movement toward jazz fusion.
Vaynerchuk and Ruhle
GARY VAYNERCHUK WITH STEPHANIE RUHLE: GENIUS, INNOVATION AND HOW TO WIN IN BUSINESS

Sun, Mar 6, 5 pm, from $50

Gary Vaynerchuk builds businesses. Fresh out of college he took his family wine business and grew it from a $3M to a $60M business in just five years. Now he runs VaynerMedia, one of the world’s hottest digital agencies. Along the way Gary became a prolific angel investor and venture capitalist, investing in companies including Facebook and Uber before eventually co-founding VaynerRSE, a $25M investment fund. Gary also hosts The #AskGaryVee Show, providing his 2 million-plus social media fans as much value as possible by answering their questions about social media and entrepreneurship, based on a lifetime of building successful, multi-million dollar companies.
In this talk, Gary speaks with Bloomberg Television anchor and managing editor Stephanie Ruhle about how he got his start and what inspires him to continue working 17-hour days even with all the success he’s already achieved. Gary explains how social media will continue to be a powerful force in business and communications and why you’d better start learning to use Snapchat. They also discuss personal qualities that can drive success, what genius means in business today and his new book #AskGaryVee: (Mar 8, HarperBusiness), which offers his most in-depth and actionable advice on how to excel in business and in life.
Ross, Petraeus, Bargmann
ALEC ROSS, DAVID PETRAEUS, CORI BARGMANN AND JARED COHEN: INDUSTRIES OF THE FUTURE
Sun, Mar 6, 7:30 pm, from $32
If that last 10 years are any indication, the next 10 years will bring massive changes to the workplace, the way we do business and the way we live in a global economy. The fields likely to shape our economic future are robotics, cybersecurity, gene-mapping and big data, among others.  Where are we likely to stumble? How can we adapt to the changing nature of work? Is the prospect of cyberwar sparking a digital arms race? And what can we do as parents to prepare our children for 2026 and beyond?

92Y brings together a panel uniquely qualified to address these questions, bringing global experience, scientific expertise and highly developed perspectives on policy to a fascinating discussion about the future of our world.

 

Alec Ross is one of today’s leading innovation experts and author of the new book, The Industries of the Future.  As Senior Advisor for Innovation to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, he developed an incomparable view of global trends. He is currently a Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Alec Ross will be signing copies of his book after the event.

Retired General David Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military, all over the globe, from Cold War Europe to Central America to Iraq, Afghanistan and the greater Middle East; following his military service, he served as CIA director.  He is now chairman of the KKR Global Institute, which focuses on geopolitical and macro-economic trends, as well as environmental, social and governance issues that shape the investment climate.

Dr. Cori Bargmann is a neurobiologist known for her work on genes, the brain and behavior.  (She discovered, for example, that a single gene determines whether animals prefer to eat alone or in social groups.)  This kind of research, linking genes with behavior, has significant implications for the future of gene therapy in humans.

Jared Cohen is the founder and director of Google Ideas, which focuses on using technology to make the world a better place.  He is a former advisor to Condoleeza Rice and Hillary Clinton, and considered one of the next generation of policy-makers. Cohen has conducted research across the Middle East and Africa, and visited North Korea with an American delegation. His books include the bestseller The New Digital Age: Transforming Nations, Business, and our Lives (Knopf, 2013, coauthored with Eric Schmidt), Children of Jihad and One Hundred Days of Silence: America and the Rwanda Genocide.

RAY KURZWEIL WITH NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON
Mon, Mar 7, 7:30 pm, from $32
Consider this scenario: In 15 – 20 years, nanobots (the size of blood cells) injected into our bodies will allow us to connect our brains to the global network of computers, the way our phones are now wirelessly connected to the cloud. Once non-biological intelligence has access to its own design it will be able to improve itself in an increasingly rapid redesign cycle and we’ll get to a point where technical progress will be so fast that unenhanced human intelligence will be unable to follow it. That will mark the Singularity;  when we will transcend the limitations of our biological bodies and brains and eliminate distinction between human and machine. So says the brilliant  inventor, author, and futurist Ray Kurzweil, who comes to 92Y to explain what this means, what it will take to get there, and why he thinks it’s good news. Kurzweil invented the first flatbed scanner and the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, among other technologies.He is a Director of Engineering at Google, heading up a team developing machine intelligence and natural language understanding. Kurzweil has written five national best-selling books, including New York Times best sellers The Singularity Is Near and How To Create A Mind. He talks with astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson.
GENIUS: MIND, BRAIN, AND MOLECULES: ROBERT MICHELS, LARRY SWANSON, THOMAS M. JESSELL IN CONVERSATION WITH ERIC R. KANDEL, M.D.
Mon, Mar 7, 7:30 pm, from $38
In the 20th Century a remarkable intellectual synthesis was achieved among three previously distinct disciplines: Cognitive Psychology, Brain Science and Molecular Biology. In each of these areas one or at most two people had the genius of vision to define their area of interest in a highly original manner that encouraged other people to join and broaden the disciplines. The challenge for the 21st century is to carry this convergence forward and complete the grand synthesis of Mind, Brain and Molecules. Three distinguished scholars and scientists navigate the future of the mind and genius in a conversation moderated by Nobel Laureate, Dr. Eric Kandel.
WHAT’S OUT THERE? A “TOUR” OF THE UNIVERSE
Mon, Mar 7, 7 pm, from $32 (Sold Out)
Pluto, it turns out, may have water. Several of Jupiter’s moons show signs of vast underground oceans. Our own Milky Way galaxy is filled with stars that host planets like our Earth. Thanks to sophisticated instruments and space-traveling telescopes, we know much more about our universe than we did 20 years ago, from dark energy, dark matter and black holes to exoplanets and the nature of the early universe. Abraham “Avi” Loeb, Chair of Harvard’s Department of Astronomy and C. Meghan Urry, Director of Yale University’s Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, offer a tour of these remarkable discoveries in a discussion moderated by Claudia Dreifus, who writes the “Conversation with…” feature in the Tuesday Science Section of The New York Times.
DR. MARTIN CHALFIE: GFP – LIGHTING UP LIFE
Tue, Mar 8, 7 pm, from $30
Dr. Martin Chalfie tells the surprising and very human story of the jellyfish protein (Green Fluorescent Protein or GFP) that revolutionized how scientists study cells.  Before GFP, researchers only saw life in snapshots. GFP gave them a dynamic view of life, allowing them look at the inner workings of living cells and watch life happen. His inspirational journey, which included a trip to Stockholm to share the 2008 Chemistry Nobel Prize, illuminates how scientific progress is often made: through accidental discoveries, the willingness to take risks and ignore previous assumptions—and through the combined efforts of many people. Martin Chalfie is a biologist and University Professor at Columbia University. In addition to introducing GFP as a means of studying biological phenomena, he uses genetics to study how nerve cells develop and function.
SCRABBLE STORIES AND PLAY FOR WORD NERDS
Wed, Mar 9, 6:30 pm, from $25
Former executive director of the National Scrabble Association John D. Williams Jr. brings to life the obsessions, madness and glory of the Scrabble culture from his experiences inside the byzantine, dog-eat-dog world of top tournament players.
Debate Co-Presented with Intelligence Squared U.S. | ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: THE RISKS OUTWEIGH THE REWARDS
Wed, Mar 9, 7 pm, from $32
As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics are sounding the alarm, going so far as to call its development an “existential threat” to mankind. Is this the stuff of science fiction? Could the “Terminator” become reality, or will these fears prevent the next technological revolution?

ARGUING FOR THE PROPOSITION: James Barrat, Author, Our Final Invention: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Human Era; Jaron Lanier, Computer Scientist, Composer & Author, Who Owns the Future?
ARGUING AGAINST THE PROPOSITION: James Hughes, Executive Director, Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies; Martine Rothblatt, Transhumanist, Entrepreneur & Author, Virtually Human

KICKSTARTER’S YANCEY STRICKLER IN CONVERSATION WITH WIRED’s JESSI HEMPEL
Wed, Mar 9, 7:30 pm, from $32
Kickstarter is all about genius. The company began in 2009 with a simple but important mission: help bring creative projects to life. To date, Kickstarter has reportedly received more than $1.9 billion in pledges from 9.4 million backers to fund a diverse range of over 257,000 creative projects, from films, music, stage shows, comics, journalism, video games, and technology. Some of the most well-known Kickstarter-backed projects include the Pebble Smartwatch, the Ouya video game console, and the Veronica Mars movie. And now, in their boldest move yet, Kickstarter is becoming a public-benefit corporation to serve the greater good as well as its shareholders. Co-founder and CEO Yancey Strickler describes how Kickstarter measures success, the culture he hopes to help create and the unique genius of doing business differently in a discussion with WIRED’s senior business and technology writer Jessi Hempel.
THE GENIUS OF GROUCHO
Thu, Mar 10, 12 pm, from $25
Born Julius Marx in 1890, the brilliant comic actor who would later be known as Groucho was one of the century’s most brilliant and influential comedians. His broad slapstick portrayals were elevated by ingenious wordplay and double entendre. In his book, Groucho Marx: The Comedy of Existence, National Magazine Award-winner Lee Siegel uncovers the roots of the performer’s outrageous intellectual acuity and hilarious insolence in Groucho’s early upbringing and Marx family dynamics. Through that lens, Siegel looks at Groucho’s work on stage, film and TV, exploring the social, cultural and psychological forces that shaped him. Lee Siegel is author of five books and writes about culture and politics for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications.
Esther and Freeman Dyson
ANGEL INVESTOR ESTHER DYSON AND PHYSICIST FREEMAN DYSON: GENIUS INVENTIONS PAST AND FUTURE
Thu, Mar 10, 5:30 pm, from $32
Theoretical physicist and mathematician Freeman Dyson has been called an heir to Einstein. He is known for his sometimes controversial opinions and his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering – which we will not attempt to explain here. Lucky for us, he is not only a brilliant scientist, but a cheerleader for science and inquiry, having written quite a few books about science for non-scientists. His most recent, Dreams of Earth and Sky, celebrates openness to unconventional ideas and “the spirit of joyful dreaming” that he believes is critical to scientific discovery. He is also the subject of the aptly titled biography Maverick Genius.

His daughter, tech guru and angel investor Esther Dyson, was named by Forbes magazine as one of the most powerful women in American business. She invests in and nurtures start-ups, with a recent focus on health care, human capital and aerospace. (She also trained outside Moscow as a backup cosmonaut.) Dyson is on the board of a direct-to-consumer gene-mapping service (23andMe) and a company developing rocket-powered aircraft for commercial use (XCor Aerospace), among many others. She has also been called the conscience of the tech industry and served as founding chairman of ICANN (the nonprofit that coordinates internet domain names) from 1998 to 2000.
We asked these two future-focused indivdiuals to share with us what they consider to be the most important inventions of the past 50 years, and what they see coming down the pike in the near future.

40 YEARS OF MOVIE MAGIC: THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF INDUSTRIAL LIGHT & MAGIC
Thu, Mar 10, 7:30 pm, from $32
Star Wars, Jurassic World, The Revenant — behind the visual magic of these thrilling blockbusters (and hundreds more) is Industrial Light & Magic, the world’s leading effects company, founded by George Lucas in 1975. What kind of creative and technical genius goes into ILM’s mind-blowing work? Three of the people who make it happen—James Clyne, Senior Art Director, Star Wars: The Force Awakens; Jason Smith, Visual Effects Supervisor, nominated for a 2016 Oscar for The Revenant; and Michael Koperwas, Computer Graphics Supervisor , ILMxLAB—provide a guided tour. And they will show, not just tell, with an exciting multimedia presentation on the latest Star Wars and the past, present and future (is virtual reality the next fronteir?) of ILM. Fasten your seat belts.
Lehrmann, Klaber, Liu
GENIUS SOLUTIONS TO SOCIAL ISSUES
Thu, Mar 10, 8 pm, from $25
Some of today’s most pressing social problems – including poverty, hunger, lack of access to technology and education, civil rights – have proven unsolvable through conventional means. Young pioneers known as social entrepreneurs, taking their cues from business leaders like Bill Gates who have made philanthropy a top priority, tackle issues head-on in increasingly innovative and “genius” ways. Join Andrew Klaber, founder of Even Ground, an international non-profit that provides children who have been orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS with academic scholarships, basic healthcare and nutrition in South Africa and Uganda; Nick Ehrmann, CEO & Founder of Blue Engine, an innovative NYC-based non-profit focused on preparing students for success in higher education; and Lily Liu, co-founder of  PublicStuff, a platform that helps cities transform their relationship with residents through technology, for a discussion about “genius” solutions to social issues. The moderator is Zachary D. Kaufman, JD, PhD, editor of Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities: Changing Our World.
Pinker, Hsu, Metzl
CAN GENIUS BE GENETICALLY ENGINEERED? STEVEN PINKER, STEPHEN HSU AND DALTON CONLEY WITH JAMIE METZL
Thu, Mar 10, 8:15 pm, from $32
Given scientific advances in genome sequencing, genetic analysis and precision gene editing, it’s becoming ever more likely that embryo selection and genetic engineering could be used to optimize the intelligence of our future children. How this will affect the future of our evolution as a species is still an open question. In this discussion, four brilliant minds come at this question from different perspectives:
Experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, is one of the world’s leading authorities on language and the mind; his recent book, The Blank Slate, explores the idea of human nature and its moral, emotional, and political implications.

Sociologist Dalton Conley, University Professor of the Social Sciences at New York University, looks at the issue in its social context; in addition to books on race and class, he also wrote Parentology, on the science of raising children, and a forthcoming book The Genome Factor: What the Social Genomics Revolution tells us about our history, ourselves and our future (Princeton University Press, Fall 2017).

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hsu, Professor of Theoretical Physics at Michigan State University, was founder and CEO of SafeWeb, an information security startup acquired by Symantec, and is a scientific advisor to BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute).

Moderator Jamie Metzl is Senior Fellow for Technology and National Security of the Atlantic Council and a former National Security Council, State Department, US Senate, and United Nations official. A globally syndicated columnist and national media commentator, he is the author of the genetics thriller Genesis Code, and his forthcoming novel, Eternal Sonata (Arcade, Fall 2016), deals with stem cell treatments that reverse the aging process.

THE GEOGRAPHY OF GENIUS
Fri, Mar 11, 12 noon, from $25
What is the connection between our surroundings and our most innovative ideas?  Acclaimed travel writer and former NPR correspondent Eric Weiner journeys from Athens to Silicon Valley—and throughout history—to show how creative genius flourishes in specific places at specific times. Weiner walks the same paths as great figures from colonial-era Calcutta to Song Dynasty Hangzhou, asking, “What was in the air, and can we bottle it?”—starting a  conversation about the importance of culture in nurturing creativity. Eric Weiner is author of The New York Times bestseller The Geography of Bliss, and the critically acclaimed Man Seeks God.
INSTAGRAM FOUNDER MIKE KRIEGER IN CONVERSATION WITH NICHOLAS THOMPSON
Fri, Mar 11, 6:30 pm, from $32
Instagram co-founder and chief technical officer Mike Krieger talks about how a spark of genius became the game-changing photo-sharing app that now counts 400 million users. Krieger oversees all engineering efforts for the app, which means that he’s the one creating the product we know and love. Krieger is a native of Brazil, and came to the US in 2004 to attend the famed Symbolic Systems program at Stanford University. He co-founded Instagram with Kevin Systrom in 2010; the company was acquired by Facebook in 2012 for $1 billion. Nicholas Thompson is the editor of Newyorker.com, where he oversees and manages the magazine’s fast-growing Web Site; he was previously senior editor at The New Yorker (magazine) and at Wired.
THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY: EXPLORING MATHEMATICAL GENIUS
Fri, Mar 11, 7:30 pm, from $32
Mathematics is a language so foreign and abstract to most of us that those proficient in it are often described as “geniuses.” But even accomplished mathematicians stand in awe of a handful of elite minds, most especially Srinivasa Ramanujan (1897-1920), subject of the upcoming film, “The Man Who Knew Infinity.” Join us as the film’s screenwriter and director, Matt Brown, shares the story of a poor young man from India who amazed the mathematical elite with his new ideas and unconventional techniques—despite a lack of formal training in advanced mathematics. Manjul Bhargava, a mathematics professor at Princeton University and a winner of the prestigious 2014 Fields Medal (awarded to a small number of mathematicians under the age of 40), provides insight into Ramanujan’s many brilliant breakthroughs in number theory and other puzzling formulas, while mathematician and author Steven Strogatz discusses the concept of genius and whether a mathematician’s mind just works differently. The World Science Festival, in partnership with the 92Y’s 7 Days of Genius Festival, takes the audience into a new universe of numbers through the epic story of Ramanujan and his unparalleled genius.
Wright, Wallace and Luzzi
In Partnership with One Day University | THE GENIUS OF MOZART, MICHELANGELO AND SHAKESPEARE
Sat, Mar 12, 9:30 am, from $119
7 Days of Genius, in partnership with One Day University, invites you to go back to college for a morning and attend classes with some of the professors who are legendary on campus for being brilliant and engaging in the classroom—that’s the criteria for all of One Day University’s presenters. This Genius edition offers one-hour lectures on three creative geniuses: Mozart, Michelangelo and Shakespeare.

Craig Wright of Yale University
Craig Wright teaches the perennially popular introductory course “Listening to Music,” which is also offered as an open online course; he also developed an interdisciplinary seminar, “Exploring the Nature of Genius.”  He brings those avenues of expertise together to explore what it is about Mozart’s music makes that makes it among the most sublime ever written, and why the composer himself was arguably the most extraordinary creator ever to set foot on this planet. The presentation includes live music and video clips from operas and the film Amadeus as well as color photographs of Mozart’s manuscripts and draft sketches.

William Wallace of Washington University in St. Louis

According to the University’s independent student newspaper, “Michelangelo is Wallace’s ‘thing.’ His office is lined with books on Michelangelo, including six he’s written himself.” In 1990, he was among 50 experts invited to Italy to consult with the Vatican over the restoration of the Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, which he sees as a compendium of Michelangelo’s art, of the Renaissance and of Christian theology—a transcendent work of genius that is never exhausted through looking or describing. Apparently, in addition to being one of the world’s most knowledgeable and personable Michelangelo scholars, he also occasionally does handstands.

Joseph Luzzi of Bard College

Where would we be without the genius of Shakespeare? From Romeo and Juliet, to the Oedipal complex of the eternally indecisive Hamlet and the “vaulting ambition” (Shakespeare’s phrase) of the tortured Macbeth, Shakespeare is an integral part of our collective culture. Joseph Luzzi, professor of comparative literature at Bard College, has been teaching Shakespeare at Bard for over a decade as co-director of their renowned “First-Year Seminar,” a year-long “great books” course for all incoming students. (Luzzi even organized dramatic readings of Othello by professional actors to bring the play to life for his students.)  His forthcoming book Dear Reader: How We Live with Literature explores the transformative power of literature, with Shakespeare as a major figure.

SPACE ODDITIES: THE GENIUS OF GENETICS, A STUDY OF TWIN-BROTHER ASTRONAUTS SCOTT AND MARK KELLY
Sat, Mar 12, 3 pm, from $30
On March 2, Astronaut Scott Kelly is scheduled to return to Earth from a year-long mission, having broken the record for longest individual space flight and most total days in space. Geneticist Christopher Mason, Ph.D., and a team of scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine have been studying the biology of the only set of identical twins to leave Earth’s atmosphere—Scott Kelly and his astronaut twin-brother Mark (who spent shorter periods in space). They are scouring the twins’ genetically identical DNA and RNA to see if human space travel leaves a genetic fingerprint (affecting metabolism, immune function, and other biological processes).Mason discusses some of the team’s findings so far, and what the potential implications are for long sojourns in space and potentially colonizing other planets—not to mention what the science means for those of us who remain Earthbound.
GENIUS FOR KIDS & FAMILIES

Dance | PILOBOLUS: RULES @ PLAY

Sat, Mar 5, 3 pm, from $25
Rules @ Play is a lively, interactive show created specifically for children and families, exploring how rules actually present opportunities to solve problems and overcome challenges. They spark creativity and, in our case, give us tools to make dances. Pilobolus dancers perform and analyze four of the company’s favorite works through movement and discussion on and off stage, showcasing the benefits of playing by the rules. Pilobolus family shows seek to help people of all ages think differently about what they see on stage and beyond.

LEONARDO da VINCI DAY @ 92Y

Sunday, March 6
Leonardo Da Vinci’s Workshop Unlocked – A FREE Interactive Exhibit For Kids And Families
11 am – 4 pm
Step inside Leonardo da Vinci’s workshop! Stop by a range of activities stations to design, create, build, and experiment as 92Y celebrates the visionary Renaissance inventor and artist.
Sunday Science Spectacular: Da Vinci and the Physics of Flight
10 am & 11 am, from $16
Leonardo da Vinci understood the principles of flight, such as Force and Lift. Kids explore these forces by designing and testing gliders and paper airplanes. They can also create soda-straw rockets and test their rockets’ trajectory and speed. (Ages 6-12)
Da Vinci’s Workshop: The Art of Flight
1:30 pm, from $5
Build what you imagine. Study da Vinci’s drawings of flight machines, then explore a variety of building materials such as balsa wood and cardboard to design your own flying machine, with an artist from 92Y’s School of Art. (Ages 4 and up)

Special Offers for 35 and Under – www.92Y.org/LexList

 

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